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I am trying to write a generic method that can take any enum of type int and be able to convert it to its int value. For example:

public int GetIntValue(Enum enumValue) {
    return (int)enumValue;
}

Here is one way that I have accomplished this, but it seems like there is a better way:

public static int ToInt(this Enum value) {
    return (int) Enum.Parse(value.GetType(), Enum.GetName(value.GetType(), value));
}

Any ideas?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You mostly had it with example 2 - you should be able to do this:

public static int ToInt(this Enum value)
{
    return Convert.ToInt32(value);
}
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1  
nope... Cannot convert type 'System.Enum' to 'int' –  Thomas Levesque Oct 31 '12 at 21:34
    
Do Convert.ToInt32(value), perhaps the program just can't deal with the type conversion =D –  Tejs Oct 31 '12 at 21:35
    
The Convert.ToInt32(value) works. –  nekizalb Oct 31 '12 at 21:45
    
@nekizalb, it works in this case, because the underlying type of this particular enum is Int32... it won't work for all enums –  Thomas Levesque Nov 1 '12 at 0:09
    
True, but that's what the asker wanted. Though, to be safe, he should probably add some error handling in the event he gets one with an underlying uint, long, or ulong value (I think those are the only ones that would break. The other values should be converted up fine). –  nekizalb Nov 1 '12 at 12:44
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The code fragment below show two ways of doing it using generics.

public enum MyEnum
{
    Three = 3,
    Seven = 7
}

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static int ToInt<T>(this T value)
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(value);
    }
}

[TestFixture]
public class CodeTests
{
    public int GetInt<T>(T value)
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(value);
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestOne()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(7, GetInt(MyEnum.Seven));
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestTwo()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(7, MyEnum.Seven.ToInt());
    }
}
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I wouldn't make this a generic method, as most objects aren't convertible to int. –  Adi Lester Oct 31 '12 at 21:44
    
Agreed, I thought the same, but the question was how to use a generic method. The issue with converting to an int is a design smell. That is 'why do you want to do that'? Answer that and the problem goes away ... but I answered coding question asked. –  Rob Smyth Oct 31 '12 at 22:16
    
I think he meant generic as in "for every type of enum". –  Adi Lester Oct 31 '12 at 22:19
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Plain and simple, just use

public static int ToInt(this Enum value)
{
    return Convert.ToInt32(value);
}
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There are a few options to convert an enum to its underlying value, which are also applicable for generics:

return Convert.ToInt32(enumValue)

or

return (int)enumValue;

or

Type integralType = Enum.GetUnderlyingType (enumValue.GetType());
return Convert.ChangeType (enumValueEnum, integralType);

or first return the string and later convert it to int?

return int.Parse(anyEnum.ToString("D"));

But personally I prefer to first option

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What if the underlying type is Int64 and the value is greater than int.MaxValue? –  Thomas Levesque Oct 31 '12 at 21:35
1  
Convert.ToInt64(enumValue)? And if you have int.MaxValue + 1 it will be equals to int.MinValue... –  mrtentje Oct 31 '12 at 21:37
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