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I have the following code,

    private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        button1.IsEnabled = false;

        var s = File.ReadAllLines("Words.txt").ToList(); // my WPF app hangs here
        // do something with s

        button1.IsEnabled = true;
    }

Words.txt has a ton of words which i read into the s variable, I am trying to make use of async and await keywords in C# 5 using Async CTP Library so the WPF app doesn't hang. So far I have the following code,

    private async void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        button1.IsEnabled = false;

        Task<string[]> ws = Task.Factory.FromAsync<string[]>(
            // What do i have here? there are so many overloads
            ); // is this the right way to do?

        var s = await File.ReadAllLines("Words.txt").ToList();  // what more do i do here apart from having the await keyword?
        // do something with s

        button1.IsEnabled = true;
    }

The goal is to read the file in async rather than sync, to avoid freezing of WPF app.

Any help is appreciated, Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
What about starting by removing the unnecessary call to ToList() which will make a copy of the string array? –  Jb Evain Oct 31 '12 at 21:57
    
@JbEvain - To be pedantic, ToList() doesn't just copy the array, it creates a List. Without further information you can't assume its unnecessary, since perhaps "// do something with s" calls List methods. –  Mike Oct 31 '12 at 22:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

private async void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    button1.IsEnabled = false;
    try
    {
        var s = await Task.Run(() => File.ReadAllLines("Words.txt").ToList());
        // do something with s
    }
    finally
    {
        button1.IsEnabled = true;
    }
}

Edit:

You don't need the try-finally for this to work. It's really only the one line that you need to change. To explain how it works: This spawns another thread (actually gets one from the thread pool) and gets that thread to read the file. When the file is finished reading then the remainder of the button1_Click method is called (from the GUI thread) with the result. Note that this is probably not the most efficient solution, but it is probably the simplest change to your code which doesn't block the the GUI.

share|improve this answer
    
Worked like a charm!!! Thanks Mike, i was able to apply Task.Factory.StartNew(() => 'Some Task') to other Tasks too, Thanks again :) –  peplamb Oct 31 '12 at 22:13
1  
While this certainly is the easiest solution and it will be most likely good enough for a simple GUI application, it doesn't use async to its full potential, because it still blocks a thread. –  svick Nov 1 '12 at 7:45
    
Also, you could shorten your code by using Task.Run(). –  svick Nov 1 '12 at 7:46
    
@svick Thanks I've edited my answer to say Task.Run() instead of Task.Factory.StartNew. I agree completely about the thread blocking. Whether that's an issue or not depends on the situation (as you say). Certainly for reading a few files by the GUI I think the overhead is negligible. –  Mike Nov 1 '12 at 15:28

You could await StreamReader.ReadToEndAsync like this:

using (var reader = File.OpenText("Words.txt"))
{
    var s = await reader.ReadToEndAsync();
    // Do something with s...
}

To get an array of lines out:

using (var reader = File.OpenText("Words.txt"))
{
    var s = await reader.ReadToEndAsync();
    return s.Split(new[] { Environment.NewLine }, StringSplitOptions.None);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know about this thanks khellang :) –  peplamb Oct 31 '12 at 22:14
2  
This would obviously get the file as a long string instead of List<string>, maybe that's not desirable in this case :) –  khellang Oct 31 '12 at 22:19
1  
This importantly uses Windows I/O ports to await this without ANY CPU threads, while the Task.Factory.StartNew/Task.Run approach in another answer wastes a CPU thread. This answer's approach is more efficient. –  Chris Moschini Jun 7 at 23:52

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