Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After a few days of searching around and trying different code, I still am not able to figure out my problem. Thus, I've posted this question here.

For this problem, I'm using Python 2.7.2 To be specific, I am using composition to import one class's function into another class. The imported class's function includes a simple if-statement based on raw_input. Depending on the user's input, the if-statement somehow should call or at least help to call a new function corresponding to the input. This function, however will be in a part of the class that is importing, rather than the class that is imported.

I am using two .py files here, one for each of the classes, and they are in the same folder.

Here is the first file (main.py), which includes the main class:

# importing class from file in same folder
from class_decision import Decision

class Main_Compositor(object):

    def __init__(self):
        # using composition to call the function of the imported class
        self.door_decision = Decision()

    def comp_door(self):
        self.door_decision.user_text()

        if door == "left":
            left_door()
        elif door == "right":
            right_door()
        else:
            print "incorrect input"

    def left_door(self):
        print "you're in the left room"

    def right_door(self):
        print "you're in the right room"


# instantiating
A_Compositor = Main_Compositor()

# calling A_Compositor's function comp_door()
A_Compositor.comp_door()

And here is the class_decision.py file, whose class is being imported:

class Decision(object):

    def user_text(self):
        print "which door do you open:"
        print "left or right?"

        door = raw_input("> ")

        if door == "left":
            print "you have chosen the left door"
            return door
        elif door == "right":
            print "you have chosen the right door"
            return door
        else:
            print "you must choose a door"
            self.user_text()

As you can see I'm trying to use Return to let the main class know the variable door. This may be an incorrect use of Return. I've also tried playing around with getattr without success. I apologize if this question has been asked a lot. The similar questions to mine all seemed to do with arrays, and I couldn't really figure out my problem through their answers. Thanks for the help.

share|improve this question
3  
Your last self.user_text() should be return self.user_text(). To fix your problem, I think you could just use door = self.door_decision.user_text(). –  Blender Oct 31 '12 at 22:03
    
Thanks, Blender. That seems to do the trick. –  Streeting Oct 31 '12 at 23:01
    
As a minor nitpick, you probably shouldn't call the instance A_Compositor, because everywhere else you're following the naming convention that titlecase is for classes, lowercase for variables. –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 23:13
    
Oh okay. I figured that since A_Compositor was an instance of a class, it should also have the capital letters that classes get. –  Streeting Oct 31 '12 at 23:22
    
No, class instances are variables, just like integers. (Actually, it's a bit more complicated—variables are just names, and any name can hold an integer, a class instance, or even a class itself… but you may not want to learn that quite yet.) –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 23:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
def user_text(self):
    print "which door do you open:"
    print "left or right?"

    door = raw_input("> ")

    if door == "left":
        print "you have chosen the left door"
        return door
    elif door == "right":
        print "you have chosen the right door"
        return door
    else:
        print "you must choose a door"
        return self.user_text()  # don't forget to return in the recursion case
def comp_door(self):
    choice = self.door_decision.user_text()  # actually use the returned result

    if choice == "left":
        self.left_door()
    elif choice == "right":
        self.right_door()
    else:
        print "incorrect input"
share|improve this answer
1  
That works, and it's probably ultimately a better design, but it doesn't tell the OP how to call a method on the "importing class" from the "imported class"—which is perfectly doable, once you understand what he means by those terms. –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 22:55
    
@abarnert: I don't understand what the OP is asking at all. An example of what they think they want to do would help. –  Eric Oct 31 '12 at 22:58
    
Thanks, Eric. I gave your code a try, but it seems I need to add self before calling either left_door() or right_door() for it to work. –  Streeting Oct 31 '12 at 23:03
    
@Streeting: Whoops, good catch –  Eric Oct 31 '12 at 23:04
    
I think what he wants to do is to make the Decision object's method call a method on whatever compositor called it. If I'm right (it would be nice to get some confirmation or contradiction from the OP), this is a way to get the same effect indirectly, by just passing a string that the compositor can switch on (which the OP was close to getting right himself, in his sample code). But he can also get the same effect directly. –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 23:07

It doesn't make sense to use a class here, since there is just one method.

Just make Decision into a function.

share|improve this answer
1  
This answer doesn't answer the question, but it is nonetheless sound advice. Unlike in a pedantically Object Oriented language like Java, in Python there is no need to create a class simply as a vehicle by which to pass around a function; pass the function around directly instead! –  Mark Amery Oct 31 '12 at 22:48
    
Thanks for writing, Roland. Yes, it's probably unnecessary to write it as I did. The thing is, I'm just doing different exercises to get to know Python better. The code I posted above is a simplified version of a slightly more complex script. I just figured I'd make a simple version of the problem I was having. –  Streeting Oct 31 '12 at 23:08
    
It seems you are making a kind of text-based adventure game? To keep things simple, consider folding the knowledge into the data. So the program logic can be simple and robust. (This is called the Rule of Representation) You could e.g. create a graph made out of Node objects. Each node contains the a list of possible choices (routes to take, objects to pick, actions) with connections to other nodes for each action. Running the adventure is then simply a matter of traversing the graph of nodes. –  Roland Smith Oct 31 '12 at 23:25
    
Thanks, Mark and Roland. Roland, yes, I am creating a text-based adventure game. I hadn't heard of either the act of folding knowledge, the Rule of Representation, or Node objects. I'll be sure to look into those. –  Streeting Oct 31 '12 at 23:29
    
The name Node is just something I made up. The technical term for the concept is a finite-state machine. –  Roland Smith Oct 31 '12 at 23:35

This function, however will be in a part of the class that is importing, rather than the class that is imported.

First, there's a bit of confusion here. You almost always do the importing at the top level of a module or script, not in a class—and that's certainly the case in the same code—so there is no "class that is importing". As for the "class that is imported", Python actually imports modules, not classes. Yes, you can import a class from a module… but it's still confusing to talk about importing classes. Also, as Mark Amery points out, the fact that you have a module called class_decision implies that you believe there has to be a tight coupling between classes and modules, which may be true in other languages, but not in Python. There's almost never a good reason to have a module with a name like that.

But I think I understand the question: in class_decision.Decision.user_text, you want to dynamically call either main_compositor.Main_Compositor.left_door() or main_compositor.Main_Compositor.right_door(), without having imported main_compositor.

And in fact, you want it to work with any Compositor object, whether it's a Main_Compositor or not.

One way to do this—as in Eric's answer—is to move the "action" from the Decision method into the caller. Just report back (via return) what action should be taken, and have the caller take that action.

But if you want to write a generic Decision that can be used with any of dozens of different compositor classes, you don't want to duplicate that if choice == "left"… logic in every single one of those classes.

Keep in mind that any time you try to make something more generic or abstract, you're making it a little harder to write and to think about. If you don't actually need that flexibility, don't write it—use Eric's answer, or just merge the two classes into one.

But if you do need Decision.user_text to be generic, and to take action on whatever compositor called it, how do you do that?

Well, there's no notion of "the object that called me" in Python, or in most other languages. Someone has to tell the method what object to talk to. Either the calling method passes a reference to self into user_text, or the containing object passes a reference to self into the Decision constructor. This is often called a "back pointer" (because in older languages it was literally a pointer, but in Python that's not relevant).

Once you know what object to talk to, it's trivial to talk to it. If you're used to a static language like C++ or Java, that isn't true—you have to do some tricky stuff, like defining an interface that all compositors must support, or using reflection (like getattr) to look for a method by name. But Python isn't static; if you have an object, that's supposed to support some method, you can just call that method on it.

In fact, you can see both sides of that from the method call syntax: something.right_door(). You need that something object or you can't call the method; once you have it, there's nothing more to calling the method than putting a dot there.

So, how do you decide whether to pass the compositor to the Decision object's constructor, or to each call to user_text? That's part of basic class design: does each instance of Decision work on a single compositor for its entire lifetime? Then pass it in the constructor. If not, pass it in the method calls.

Here's what the latter would look like:

class Main_Compositor(object):
    ...
    def comp_door(self):
        self.door_decision.user_text(self)

class Decision(object):

    def user_text(self, compositor):
        print "which door do you open:"
        print "left or right?"

        door = raw_input("> ")

        if door == "left":
            print "you have chosen the left door"
            compositor.left_door()
        elif door == "right":
            print "you have chosen the right door"
            compositor.right_door()
        else:
            print "you must choose a door"
            self.user_text()

If you want to store the back pointer as part of the Decision, that looks like this:

class Main_Compositor(object):

    def __init__(self):
        # using composition to call the function of the imported class
        self.door_decision = Decision(self)

    ...

class Decision(object):

    def __init__(self, compositor):

        self.compositor = compositor

    def user_text(self):
        print "which door do you open:"
        print "left or right?"

        door = raw_input("> ")

        if door == "left":
            print "you have chosen the left door"
            self.compositor.left_door()
        elif door == "right":
            print "you have chosen the right door"
            self.compositor.right_door()
        else:
            print "you must choose a door"
            self.user_text()

One thing to keep in mind here is that it can be confusing which object is the owner here, and which one has a back reference. Besides confusing human readers, you can even confuse the interpreter, causing memory leaks. (You may need to look at weakref…) That's one of the costs of flexibility.

It's worth noting that in your sample, there actually is a global variable you could use. But that's generally not a good design. And in this specific case, you get no extra flexibility by using the global variable—there can only be one compositor—so you haven't gained anything by making Decision more complex.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why has someone downvoted, undownvoted, downvoted, undownvoted, and downvoted this answer, all without leaving a single comment? –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 23:04
    
Thanks for writing, abarnert. I didn't down vote you. I gave an instance of Main_Compositor at the bottom of my first script, with A_Compositor = Main_Compositor(). You're right that there is some confusion here. I'm only really beginning with programming. –  Streeting Oct 31 '12 at 23:04
    
@Streeting: The comment isn't addressed to you, but to whoever keeps playing with the buttons… –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 23:05
    
Well, your Decision object could access the global A_Compositor object, but that's probably a bad idea, for all the usual reasons that globals are bad. If Decision or its methods need to interact with a compositor, they should be directly given access to the compositor they need to interact with. (PS, there's no shame in being a beginner; we all were at some point, and you're obviously looking to learn, so you won't be for long.) –  abarnert Oct 31 '12 at 23:09
    
@abarnet Hey. Sorry, my downvote. Was in two minds about it and have been writing while changing my mind. Two reasons. First, it's legit here for him to say that he's 'importing' the Decision class. Indeed, that's precisely how Python says it: 'from class_decision import Decision'. I agree that the OP seems to have some confusion but I suspect this stems from not understanding that, unlike in some strict OO languages, in Python there is not a one-to-one relationship between modules and classes - esp. given the 'class_decision' module name. Your remark does not, I feel, get to the root of this. –  Mark Amery Oct 31 '12 at 23:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.