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Suppose I have a struct with a member that is a vector. In the constructor, I want to just set it to NULL. But then later I want to be able to push_back things to it. How do I initialize the vector after it's NULL?

struct structName {
    vector<int> vec;
    structName() {
        vec = NULL
    }
    void set(int);
}

void structName::set(int n) {
    // What do I put here?
    vec.push_back(n);
}

Thanks for the help!

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4 Answers 4

It's already initialized via the default constructor and, if you need to call a different constructor, use an initialization list.

Remember, this is C++, not Java/C#/whatever. It makes no sense for an object to be null (ok, it doesn't in those languages either, but read on). It can't happen. In Java and languages like it you have variables which are references to objects and those references (not objects!) may or may not be null.

That is not the case in C++. There is a strict delineation between objects and pointers which refer to them (and pointers, or course, can be null or refer to an invalid memory location).

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The default constructor for the vector will set it to its simplest state: no contents. So just leave it alone.

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I think you be thinking of C++ objects like you would in Java. DON'T They are totally different beasts.

In C++, objects aren't references as in Java, thus, nulling them out doesn't make sense. In fact trying vec = NULL is an error as NULL is really just 0.

Instead just remove the line vec = NULL and it'll work as is. The vector will be default constructed as empty and you don't have to do any other initialization.

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Initializing a vector to NULL doesn't make any sense. Perhaps you're getting confused with pointers. If you want to initialize your vector to the empty vector then that happens automatically. Like this in other words

struct structName {
    vector<int> vec;
    structName() {
    }
    void set(int);
}

void structName::set(int n) {
    vec.push_back(n);
}
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Thanks, that makes perfect sense... I'm using this to make a hash table. Will empty vectors take up too much space do you think? –  user1789919 Oct 31 '12 at 22:45
    
I would expect (on a 32 bit machine) for an empty vector to take up 12 bytes. But if you want to test this try sizeof(vector<int>). –  john Oct 31 '12 at 22:47
    
@john: 20 in VS2010, just an FYI. user17... vectors aren't big. Their backing data store can get big, but the vector itself is small. –  Ed S. Oct 31 '12 at 22:52
    
@EdS. 20 bytes in debug mode, but 16 bytes in release mode. Still slightly disappointing. I think a good implementation would only use 12. Point about the backing data is correct of course but I would expect a default constructed empty vector to have precisely zero bytes allocated for the data. –  john Oct 31 '12 at 22:56
    
@john: D'oh! Can't believe I left it in Debug... and yeah, I would expect the same for an empty vector of course. –  Ed S. Oct 31 '12 at 22:57

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