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Im trying to emulate a TCP Server on the same PC where the app is running. I dont know if it can be done in Perl because im not very experienced.

With the code bellow the first reply is working but i dont know how to implement the second.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use IO::Socket::INET;
use strict;


my $socket = IO::Socket::INET->new('LocalPort' => '3000',
                   'Proto' => 'tcp',
                   'Listen' => SOMAXCONN)
    or die "Can't create socket ($!)\n";
print "Server listening\n";
while (my $client = $socket->accept) {
    my $name = gethostbyaddr($client->peeraddr, AF_INET);
    my $port = $client->peerport;
    while (<$client>) {
    print "$_";
    print $client "RESPONSE1";
    }
    close $client
    or die "Can't close ($!)\n";
}
die "Can't accept socket ($!)\n";

EDIT: Thank you guys for the imput, i ended up with php done it and its working, yay!

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you have to fork. See that question for example stackoverflow.com/questions/7662711/… –  eicto Nov 1 '12 at 0:12
    
either fork or use event driven io, e.g. Event driven programming in Perl using the Event module –  user5402 Nov 1 '12 at 1:29
    
Even the author of Event no longer recommends it, try AnyEvent, POE, IO::Async, or for a similar API to Event, try EV –  MkV Nov 1 '12 at 6:40
    
You really don't need to fork just to handle a single connection, though I wouldn't use IO::Socket directly, perhaps use Net::Server –  MkV Nov 1 '12 at 6:45
    
You should be using 'use warnings;' not -w –  MkV Nov 1 '12 at 7:10
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use Net::Server for the connection, and a variable in the sub to keep the current state ($state in this code); something like this:

package MyServer;
use base qw/Net::Server/;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub process_request {
  my $self = shift;
  my $state = 0;
  while (<STDIN>) {
    s/\r?\n$//; # like chomp but for crlf too
    if ($state == 0 and $_ eq 'data1') {
      print "> okay1\n";
      $state++;
    } elsif ($state == 1 and $_ eq 'data2') {
      print "> okay2\n";
      $state++;
    } else {
      last if $state == 2;
      $state = 0;
    }
  }
}

my $port = shift || 3000;
MyServer->run( port => $port );

The example in the Net::Server POD suggests using an alarm to timeout connections, which might be appropriate here. The code above does the following:

$ nc localhost 3000
data1
> okay1
data2
> okay2
data3
$

And if you need to move to a forking / preforking / non-blocking / co-routine driven system, there's a Net::Server personality for that.

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Thanks you very much for your answer, can i set in the if states data1 & data2 hex like this eq '\x{de}\x{c0}\x{ad}' , the server doesnt seem to reply when it matches the data –  Mark Nov 1 '12 at 15:49
    
Yeah, unles that is terminated by some sort of line feed, that won't work, while (<STDIN>) reads lines, you would want to do something like while ( read( *STDIN, local $_, 3 ) ) instead of while (<STDIN>) –  MkV Nov 2 '12 at 19:50
    
If you really are using single quotes for the string, you should be using double quotes so that the hex escapes work, i.e. $_ eq "\x{de}\x{co}\x{ad}" –  MkV Nov 2 '12 at 19:54
    
Describe the situation a bit more fully, whether the input is per line or characters, for example. –  MkV Nov 2 '12 at 20:22
    
I am really sorry i really suck at perl, it still doesnt work i dont know if i actually need to replace some variables, i have maybe said too little how it should work, could you provide a ready to go code for this situation: app sends to server \x{de}\x{c0}\x{ad}, server then replies to just that specific data \x{c4}\x{1a}\x{20}\x{de} app sends another hex data to server \x{18}\x{c0}\x{0a} server then again replies to just that specific data \x{11}\x{01}\x{73}\x{93} –  Mark Nov 2 '12 at 20:23
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"ready to go" code:

package MyServer;
use base qw/Net::Server/;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub process_request {
  my $self = shift;
  my $state = 0;
  $| = 1;
  binmode *STDIN;
  while (read(*STDIN, local $_, 3 )) {
    if ($state == 0 and $_ eq "\x{de}\x{c0}\x{ad}") {
      print "\x{c4}\x{1a}\x{20}\x{de}";
      $state++;
    } elsif ($state == 1 and $_ eq "\x{18}\x{c0}\x{0a}") {
      print "\x{11}\x{01}\x{73}\x{93}";
      $state++;
      last;
    }
  }
}

my $port = shift || 3000;
MyServer->run( port => $port );
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It seems to me process_request sub doesn't work correctly when a low port is set (in my situation, port 23). In particular only with low port, while parsing data input, the first request contains additional chars (but it's all ok with subsequent requests). Have you a tips? Thank you

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