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Say I have two classes, ClassA and ClassB.

ClassB inherits ClassA, and has some additional functions and variables.

Is it possible for me to make a function that can accept either ClassA or ClassB as the same argument, and let me determine which one was used?

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1  
You can use polymorphism and Real Time Type Information (RTTI). –  imreal Oct 31 '12 at 23:01
1  
Well yes, and in several different ways, but my immediate thought wasjust overload the function and then you don't have to worry about it. –  Tony Hopkinson Oct 31 '12 at 23:07
    
Can you give some detail about what your function is supposed to do? –  Kerrek SB Oct 31 '12 at 23:20
    
One common guideline is to make non-leaf classes abstract, so that this situation cannot happen. –  Kerrek SB Oct 31 '12 at 23:23
    
@Tony Hopkinson - I don't know why I didn't think of that in the first place, but overloading actually did fix my problem in this case. –  Morgan Oct 31 '12 at 23:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you can take the parameter by reference:

void foo(ClassA& x) //or const ClassA

You'll be able to pass both instances of ClassA or ClassB, and use RTTI to determine which type it actually is inside the function.

Alternatively, you can pass a pointer to ClassA, but references are to be preferred where possible.

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Declare the function parameter to be a pointer or a reference to an ClassA instance (don't pass it by value or the input instance will get sliced at runtime). Then you can use dynamic_cast if you need to access ClassB-specific functionality. For example:

class ClassA
{
public:
    int a;

    virtual ~ClassA() {}
    void DoSomething();
};

class ClassB : public ClassA
{
public:
    int b;
    void DoSomethingElse();
};

void func(ClassA *obj)
{
    int a = obj->a;
    obj->DoSomething();

    ClassB *objB = dynamic_cast<ClassB*>(obj);
    if (objB)
    {
        int b = objB->b;
        objB->DoSomethingElse();
    }
}

int main()
{
    ClassA a;
    func(&a);

    ClassB b;
    func(&b);

    return 0;
}
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Here's an idea with a bit of indirection. The function Consumer::accept accepts both objects of type A and type B, and the specific behaviour is implemented by those classes rather than by your consumer.

struct Consumer;

struct A
{
    virtual ~A() { }
    virtual int use(Consumer &);
};

struct B : A
{
    virtual int use(Consumer &);
};

struct Consumer
{
    void accept(A & x)
    { 
        int n = x.use(*this);
        do_more_stuff(n);
    }

    void do_more_stuff(int);

    // ...
};
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