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Can you please post example code to levelize a directed graph using BGL? Definition of levelization: Vertex has a property "int level". During BFS traversal of the graph, when a vertex is being "examined", look at its predecessor vertices' levels, take max of these, increment, and assign this to the "level" of this vertex.

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You're halfway there already; you have the algorithmic basis for doing this, just need the code. Unfortunately, this site isn't for getting other people to write out code. You should show us what you've tried and then we can help you get over any obstacles. –  Nathaniel Ford Oct 31 '12 at 23:40
    
Is the graph acyclic? If so, you might want to look at libs/graph/test/dag_longest_paths.cpp in the Boost source tree for an example that seems to do what you want. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jul 7 '13 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

If you mean the BFS depth then this is already built in to boost BFS and can be gotten easily.

Just use a vector to store the depths and a depth BFS visitor like this example I made:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#include <boost/graph/adjacency_list.hpp>
#include <boost/graph/graph_traits.hpp>
#include <boost/graph/breadth_first_search.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

typedef adjacency_list < vecS, vecS, directedS,
                    property< vertex_index_t, size_t> ,
                    property< edge_index_t, size_t > > Graph;

typedef graph_traits<Graph>::vertex_descriptor Vertex;
typedef graph_traits<Graph>::edge_descriptor Edge;



int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

    Graph G;

    vector<Vertex> verts;

    for(size_t i = 0; i < 9; ++i){
        Vertex v = add_vertex(G);
        verts.push_back(v);
    }

   /*
    0          0
             /  \
    1        1    4
           /      \
    2      2        5
         /          \
    3   3            6
                      \
    4                  7
                        \
    5                    8
   */
    add_edge(verts.at(0),verts.at(1),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(1),verts.at(2),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(2),verts.at(3),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(0),verts.at(4),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(4),verts.at(5),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(5),verts.at(6),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(6),verts.at(7),G);
    add_edge(verts.at(7),verts.at(8),G);

    cout << "vertices " << num_vertices(G) << endl;
    cout << "edges    " << num_edges(G) << endl;


    //store depths
    vector<size_t> d(num_vertices(G));

    //get an index map, from Graph definition property< vertex_index_t, size_t>
    typedef boost::property_map< Graph, boost::vertex_index_t>::type VertexIndexMap;
    VertexIndexMap v_index = get(boost::vertex_index, G);

    // Create the external property map, this map wraps the storage vector d
    boost::iterator_property_map< std::vector< size_t >::iterator, VertexIndexMap >
        d_map(d.begin(), v_index);


    //Start at 0
    boost::breadth_first_search(G, verts.at(0),
        boost::visitor(boost::make_bfs_visitor(
          boost::record_distances(d_map, boost::on_tree_edge())
          )));

    cout << "Starting at 0" << endl;

    for(size_t i = 0; i < 9; ++i){
        //depth (level) of BFS
        cout << "vertex " << i << "\t" << d.at(i) << endl; 
    }

    vector<size_t> d2(num_vertices(G));



    cout << "Starting at 4" << endl;

    // Create the external property map, this map wraps the storage vector d
    boost::iterator_property_map< std::vector< size_t >::iterator, VertexIndexMap >
        d2_map(d2.begin(), v_index);

    //start at 4
    boost::breadth_first_search(G, verts.at(4),
        boost::visitor(boost::make_bfs_visitor(
          boost::record_distances(d2_map, boost::on_tree_edge())
          )));

    for(size_t i = 0; i < 9; ++i){
        //depth (level) of BFS
        cout << "vertex " << i << "\t" << d2.at(i) << endl; 
    }

}

Output should look like this:
vertices 9
edges 8
Starting at 0
vertex 0 0
vertex 1 1
vertex 2 2
vertex 3 3
vertex 4 1
vertex 5 2
vertex 6 3
vertex 7 4
vertex 8 5
Starting at 4
vertex 0 0
vertex 1 0
vertex 2 0
vertex 3 0
vertex 4 0
vertex 5 1
vertex 6 2
vertex 7 3
vertex 8 4

When you start at 4 the other vertices are not reachable (directed) so the vector contains default values (0 in this case). This should work for undirected too.

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