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I'm currently designing a linux c++ application. It will be run from the command line, then once running I need to be able to issue commands to control its execution, ideally something like the following:

$ sudo ./myapplication
APP > 
APP > 
APP > //just pressing return
APP > openlog test1.txt //APP will now call the openlog function
APP >

I imagine this is a relatively simple task, but I have no idea what such an interface would be called in order to search for one. Does anybody know of a library or example that can perform this function? Or do I need to write my own using cout and cin? If so, would there be any preferred approach?

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C++ doesn't have reflection. You'll have to work around that. –  chris Oct 31 '12 at 23:22
    
If you don't know how to do this, you shouldn't be writing applications to be run by superuser.... –  Barmar Oct 31 '12 at 23:42
    
@Barmar It's hyperbolic to say that this application needs to be run by su, and moreso to say someone shouldn't write applications that are run by super-user because of a perceived level of expertise. –  Nathaniel Ford Oct 31 '12 at 23:54
    
@Duck, I was going off of the comment, APP will now call the openlog function. While it's possible in languages such as C# for a user to enter the name of an arbitrary function, as well as the argument values, using reflection, doing something to that effect in C++ isn't quite as easy or robust. –  chris Nov 1 '12 at 0:01
1  
Do you want REPL (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Read%E2%80%93eval%E2%80%93print_loop )? Or something else? –  n0rd Nov 1 '12 at 0:06
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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I recommend the GNU readline library for this. It takes care of the tedious work of getting lines of input, and allows the user to edit his line with backspace, left and right arrows, etc, and to recall older command using the up arrow and even search for older command using ^R, etc. Readline comes installed with typical unix-like distributions like linux, but if you don't have it, you can find it here

Edit: Here is a minimal readline example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <readline/readline.h>
#include <readline/history.h>

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    while(1)
    {
        char * line = readline("> ");
        if(!line) break;
        if(*line) add_history(line);
        /* Do something with the line here */
        free(line);
    }
}
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You forgot to free(line); at the end of the loop –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 1 '12 at 8:27
    
Oh, you're right. I had the free behavior mixed up with getline, which will realloc automatically. –  amaurea Nov 1 '12 at 12:30
    
This is exactly what I was looking for, thanks! –  Matthew Watson Nov 1 '12 at 16:11
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The GNU readline library is great if you want full line-editing and history features, but if a simple prompt suffices (or if you don't want the GNU license), then you can do this with just the standard library:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void process(std::string const & line);

int main()
{
    for (std::string line; std::cout << "APP > " && std::getline(std::cin, line); )
    {
        if (!line.empty()) { process(line); }
    }

    std::cout << "Goodbye.\n";
}
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You should probably take a look at the readline library. It has a bit of a learning curve but it is still vastly easier than recreating a full CLI on your own. Check the licensing though since it might not be appropriate for your project.

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You will have to at least partially roll your own. GNU readline might be able to help slightly; check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_readline for a short program that is the "skeleton" that achieves this and around which you can actually add code.

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I agree with Chris's comment that this will be harder in a language that isn't reflective. In C++, you'll need to explicitly map whatever you type to a specific function.

If you're going to roll your own, your general design should look something like this:

  • Read input line (most likely using cin.getline into a string)
  • Identify the first word and determine whether it maps to any function (e.g. you could use a simple switch statement, hash table, etc)
  • If it doesn't map to a function, post an error and reprint the prompt.
  • If it does map, you have to examine the other words in the line.
  • For each other word, you'll have to convert the string into whatever data type you want as the function parameters on a word-by-word basis (stringstreams will come in handy here).
  • Now you have to make sure that the parameters you supplied are legitimate for the function you've called. You can either pre-check them before calling the function, or check for errors inside the function.
  • Once you've verified your function name and parameters are correct (and of the right number) you can call the function.

In a reflective language, the first half of that is much simplified as you may be able to convert a string directly to a function name.

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I would highly recommend std::getline over std::istream::getline. –  chris Nov 1 '12 at 1:07
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GNU readline is by far an excellent selection, as others have suggested. If licensing concerns would force you to rule it out, then you should then consider linenoise.

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You can write your application as TCL or python application and use them as front-end.

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