Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To improve performance in my clique-partitioning program, which uses ordered arrays, I included in the stop condition of my for loop an access to an element of the array I'm looping into.

int myValue = 13;

for (int i=0; array[i] < myValue; i++)
{
    //performing operations on the array
}

This is clearly unsafe, since it could be that my array only contains values that are less than myValue, so I tried this

int myValue = 13;

for (int i=0; i < array.size() && array[i] < myValue; i++)
{
    //performing operations on the array
}

In this implementation, all seems to go well, but if I switch the conditions, I fall into the same problem of the first example.

int myValue = 13;

for (int i=0; array[i] < myValue && i < array.size(); i++)
{
    //performing operations on the array
}

So, I deduced that this is clearly due to the way the compiler sets the order of the two conditions, since in the last case, even if I ask to enter the loop only if i is not greater than the size of the array, I'm previously reading a value that could be out of the bounds of the array.

My question is: is it always safe to do as I did in the second implementation, or could the compiler sometimes switch my control conditions leading to unsafe code?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The && (logical and) operator always short circuits if it can. Your second example is safe.

Note, this applies to primitive types only, not those that overload the boolean operators.

Because no self-respecting C++ answer would be complete without a standard quote:

5.14.1 (Logical AND) The && operator groups left-to-right. The operands are both contextually converted to type bool (Clause 4). The result is true if both operands are true and false otherwise. Unlike &, && guarantees left-to-right evaluation: the second operand is not evaluated if the first operand is false.

5.14.2 (Logical OR) The || operator groups left-to-right. The operands are both contextually converted to bool (Clause 4). It returns true if either of its operands is true, and false otherwise. Unlike |, || guarantees left-to-right evaluation; moreover, the second operand is not evaluated if the first operand evaluates to true.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the precise answer, this also taught me a lot on how stackoverflow works (it was my first question here) –  unziberla Nov 1 '12 at 0:42

I wouldn't do either examples. Do this:

for (int i=0; i < array.size(); i++) {
    if (array[i] >= myValue) {
        break;
    }

    // do stuff
}

This way you don't have any confusion or lack of safety. It has the same speed as the other examples but it's far more straightforward for debugging later.

share|improve this answer
    
While I agree this is better code, it doesn't really answer the question. The gist of his question is actually unrelated to looping, but about how && works. –  Barmar Nov 1 '12 at 0:24
    
I think this answer does concern with my question, too. In fact I thought about a solution like this but I didn't realize it was so simple (and also I normally avoid breaks because I was taught so) –  unziberla Nov 1 '12 at 2:27
    
break is dangerous for very beginning programmers because it can result in code that does 'unexpected' things. But it makes looping logic much, much more straightforward once you're out of your second week of CS 001. I do think it's important to understand early exits and logical operators but code readability is extremely important too. "Loop through every element in the array. IF the element is too big, stop looping." versus "loop when the elements are small, but stop when they're too big and when the array is done". Which English is less confusing? Therefore which code is less confusing? –  durron597 Nov 1 '12 at 14:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.