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I would like to merge vectors of Latin and Greek text to generate plot titles, axis labels, legend entries, etc. I have provided a trivial example below. I cannot figure out how to render the Greek letters in their native form. I have tried various combinations of expression, parse, and apply to the paste command but I have not been able to vectorize the code that readily generates mixed Latin/Greek text for the case of a single expression (e.g., expression("A ("*alpha*")") is suitable in the case of a single expression).

data<-matrix(seq(20),nrow=5,ncol=4,byrow=TRUE)
colnames(data)<-c("A","B","C","D")
greek<-c(" (alpha)"," (beta)"," (gamma)"," (delta)")
matplot(data)
legend(1,max(data),fill=c("black","red","green","blue"),apply(matrix(paste(colnames(data),greek,sep=""),nrow=4,ncol=1),1,expression))

Could you please help me with the apply() statement within the legend() statement? It requires some modification to produce the desired output (i.e., A (α), B(β), C(γ), D(δ)). Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's an alternative that avoids parse(), and works with the example mentioned in your first comment to @mnel's nice answer:

greek <- c("alpha", "beta", "gamma", "delta")
cnames <- paste(LETTERS[1:4], letters[1:4])

legend_expressions <- 
sapply(1:4, function(i) {
    as.expression(substitute(A (B), 
                  list(A = as.name(cnames[i]), B = as.name(greek[i]))))
})

matplot(data)
legend(1,max(data),fill=c("black","red","green","blue"),legend_expressions)

enter image description here

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Thanks, Josh. Your solution is very robust for different inputs. Could you explain why A (B), A*B, and A~B work in the substitute statement, whereas A B does not? Could you also comment for the new users why the as. syntax is required? I read that substitute returns an unevaluated expression, so acting on the output of substitute with as.expression makes sense. What about as.name? –  user001 Nov 1 '12 at 2:32
1  
@user001 -- As you likely know, this section of the "R Language Definition" is a good starting point for leaning about R's language elements and how to manipulate them. substitute() can take as its first argument any syntactically valid statement. A B is not "allowed" because it's syntactically valid. (Can you think of any R statement typed at the command line that has that form? I thought not!). –  Josh O'Brien Nov 1 '12 at 15:03
1  
@user001 -- substitute() does not generally return objects of class "expression". (See the "Value" section of ?substitute, and play around with class(substitute()) to see what I mean: class(substitute(x)); class(substitute(x(y))); class(substitute({x; y})); class(substitute(expression(x))) etc.) I use as.expression() to coerce whatever it returns to an expression object. expressions are a type of vector, so sapply() just concatenates the several length-1 expressions into a single length-4 expression vector. See ?as.name to learn about as.name(). Hope this helps! –  Josh O'Brien Nov 1 '12 at 15:14
    
Thanks for the added clarification. I ultimately decided to select your answer because it was least sensitive to changes in the format of the input (e.g., adding spaces to strings). –  user001 Nov 1 '12 at 21:39

Don't use apply create a vector of expressions.

Instead use parse(text = ...).

.expressions <- paste(colnames(data),greek,sep="")
legend_expressions <-parse(text = .expressions)

matplot(data)
legend(1,max(data),fill=c("black","red","green","blue"),legend_expressions)

enter image description here

If you want to include ~ within the expressions. Given your current workflow, it would seem easiest to replace sep = '' with sep = '~' within the call to paste

.expressions <- paste(colnames(data),greek,sep="~")
legend_expressions <-parse(text = .expressions)

matplot(data)
legend(1,max(data),fill=c("black","red","green","blue"),legend_expressions)

enter image description here

It might even be clearer to use sprintf to form the character strings which will become your expression vector.

If you want to include character strings that include spaces, you will need to wrap these strings in quotation marks within the string. For example.

greek <- c("alpha", "beta", "gamma", "delta")
other_stuff <- c('hello world','again this','and again','hello')

.expressions <- mapply(sprintf, colnames(data), other_stuff, greek, 
                       MoreArgs = list(fmt = '"%s %s"~(%s)'))

.expressions  
##                           A                           B                           C                           D 
## "\"A hello world\"~(alpha)"   "\"B again this\"~(beta)"   "\"C and again\"~(gamma)"       "\"D hello\"~(delta)" 

 legend_expressions <-parse(text = .expressions)

matplot(data)
legend(1,max(data),fill=c("black","red","green","blue"),legend_expressions)

enter image description here

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Thanks for your very helpful solution. Could you tell me how spaces could be incorporated in the labels without explicitly using ~ characters? For instance, redefining colnames(data) to c("A~a","B~b","C~c","D~d") is acceptable whereas redefining to c("A a","B b","C c","D d") is not (using the latter definition gives an unexpected symbol error when executing the parse statement). Perhaps if I don't want the tilde characters in the column names, I should use a string substitution function to replace all spaces with tildes before the parse statement? –  user001 Nov 1 '12 at 1:12
1  
See my edit...... –  mnel Nov 1 '12 at 1:19
    
Thanks @mnel. I want to be able to include spaces in the colnames (e.g., "A a" instead of "A"). However, the parse statement fails when colnames includes a space. If the space is replaced with a tilde (e.g., "A~a" instead of "A a"), then parse statement no longer fails. Using ~ as the sep in paste still does not work for a colname with a space like "A a". –  user001 Nov 1 '12 at 1:25
    
colnames without spaces are non syntatic and thus I would not be a good idea to try and set these as the colnames for your matrix or data.frame. I think my mapply(sprintf,...) solution would be the easiest to implement this with. –  mnel Nov 1 '12 at 1:28
1  
The trick to get them to work with expressions is to wrap them in quotation marks within the string. This is now implemented –  mnel Nov 1 '12 at 1:31

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