Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got two properties files and I'd like to replace key/value pairs in File A with any matching key/value entries in File B. File A will have more entries than File B - it's not expected that the two files will have the exact same number of entries. Also, File B might have entries which are not included in File A.

As an example:

File A
"GB" = "United Kingdom";
"SE" = "Sweden";
"BR" = "Brazil";
"FR" = "France";
"ES" = "Spain";
"DE" = "Germany";

File B
"GB" = "Regno Unito";
"SE" = "Svezia";
"BR" = "Brasile";
"BR" = "Brasile";
"CL" = "Cile";

Desired Result
"GB" = "Regno Unito";
"SE" = "Svezia";
"BR" = "Brasile";
"FR" = "France";
"ES" = "Spain";
"DE" = "Germany";
"CL" = "Cile";

Is it possible to execute this search and replace using bash?

Thanks,

Sean

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  ghoti Nov 1 '12 at 1:02
    
I hadn't really tried a solution myself. Was just asking for guidance in this question. –  seanoshea Nov 1 '12 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk:

awk -F " = " 'FNR==NR { array[$1]=$2; next } $1 in array { sub ($2, array[$1]) }1' fileb filea

Results:

"GB" = "Regno Unito";
"SE" = "Svezia";
"BR" = "Brasile";
"FR" = "France";
"ES" = "Spain";
"DE" = "Germany";

EDIT:

You can simply delete the array elements after a substitution has occurred. Then at the end of the script, print out what's left:

awk -F " = " 'FNR==NR { array[$1]=$2; next } $1 in array { sub ($2, array[$1]); delete array[$1] }1; END { for (i in array) print i FS array[i] }' fileb filea

Results:

"GB" = "Regno Unito";
"SE" = "Svezia";
"BR" = "Brasile";
"FR" = "France";
"ES" = "Spain";
"DE" = "Germany";
"CL" = "Cile";
share|improve this answer
    
+1. It seems that every awk post I see of yours includes FNR==NR. :-) –  ghoti Nov 1 '12 at 1:11
    
@ghoti: Thanks mate. You're right, it's my favorite construct and it's pretty easy on the eyes too :-) –  Steve Nov 1 '12 at 1:22
1  
I'll just point out that the nothing in your answer is particularly gawkish. A far as I can tell, it should work perfectly fine in non-GNU awk. –  ghoti Nov 1 '12 at 1:53
    
This script nearly does exactly what I need. However, the files that I have to work with have the following output from file -I: "Localizable.strings: text/html; charset=utf-16le". Is there any way to get awk to read files like this. I tried converting the files to UTF-8, but that results in a corrupted file. –  seanoshea Nov 1 '12 at 22:05
1  
@seanoshea: Just wondering if you have seen my comment under your new question? –  Steve Nov 1 '12 at 22:45

The following bash-only script will spit out the results you're asking for:

#!/bin/bash

# Identify our files. If you want, test for their existence before proceeding.
fileA="$1"
fileB="$2"

# Define an associated array
declare -A countries

# Read our initial data
while read cc junk name; do
 if [[ -n "$cc" ]]; then
   countries["$cc"]="$name"
 fi
done < "$fileA"

# Overwrite array elements with updated values
while read cc junk name; do
 if [[ -n "$cc" ]]; then
   countries["$cc"]="$name"
 fi
done < "$fileB"

# Print the results
for cc in "${!countries[@]}"; do
  echo "$cc = ${countries[$cc]}"
done

The results won't be in exactly the same order, but I suspect that isn't important. If it is, you can create an additional array whose index is a counter, then instead of the final for cc in ..., you can simply walk through that array to get the $countries indices in the right order. Let me know if that's important and you can't figure it out.

I only post this here because you asked for a bash solution. Steve's awk script is much more succinct, and probably a lot faster. (Just guessing. It probably isn't even worth the time to benchmark it.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.