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I have a variety of arrays that will either contain

story & message

or just

story

How would I check to see if an array contains both story and message? array_key_exsists only looks for that single key in the array.

Is there a way to do this? I am just getting into PHP and so far the interwebz have been useful, but when I search for this, I find multidimensional solutions, and these keys are on the same level.

Thanks

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1  
If "story" will be there in either case, it sounds like you really just need to check for "message". –  Wyzard Nov 1 '12 at 1:03
2  
Using array_intersect_key() compare an array of the keys you want to verify with the array you are checking. If the length of the output is the same as the array of keys to check, they're all present. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 1 '12 at 1:04
    
Wyzard, I have other arrays that contain message, but not story, but those have other keys that an array with either story, or story and message would only contain. Thanks –  Ryan Nov 1 '12 at 1:07
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use array_key_exists() twice to check if the key exists.

if (array_key_exists("story", $arr) AND array_key_exists("message", $arr)) {
    // Both keys exist.
}

CodePad.

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7  
oh really? I had no idea you could call it twice... I didn't see any documentation on using it twice like that. Learn something new everyday. Thank you. –  Ryan Nov 1 '12 at 1:04
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Here is a solution that's scalable, even if you want to check for a lot of keys:

<?php

//The values in this arrays contains the names of the indexes (keys) that should exist in the data array
$required = array('key1', 'key2', 'key3' );

$data = array(
    'key1' => 10,
    'key2' => 20,
    'key3' => 30,
    'key4' => 40
);

if(count(array_intersect_key(array_flip($required), $data)) === count($required)) {
    //All required keys exist!              
}
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I would like to know the reason why this got downvoted.. afaik this is faster because array_intersect_key is implemented in C and you won't need a loop –  Erfan Aug 16 '13 at 1:09
    
Pretty clever actually, well done - though a bit hard to read. –  Jon z Oct 26 '13 at 16:06
    
Thanks :) It's odd PHP doesn't have a built-in function to do this - it's quite common. There are tons of user input validation classes that do this, but for most use-cases its overkill –  Erfan Oct 30 '13 at 8:35
    
Clever solution indeed but it's really slower (about 50% slower on my box) than a straightforward : ``` $ok = true; foreach( $required as $field ) { if( !array_key_exists( $field, $data ) ) $ok = false; } –  Ozh Dec 24 '13 at 17:29
    
+1 for the clever solution.. Thanks... –  Amol M Kulkarni 2 days ago
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Surprisingly array_keys_exist doesn't exist?! In the interim that leaves some space to figure out a single line expression for this common task. I'm thinking of a shell script or another small program.

Note: each of the following solutions use concise […] array declaration syntax available in php 5.4+

array_diff + array_keys

if (0 === count(array_diff(['story', 'message', '…'], array_keys($source)))) {
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}

(hat tip to Kim Stacks)

This approach is the most brief I've found. array_diff() returns an array of items present in argument 1 not present in argument2. Therefore an empty array indicates all keys were found. In php 5.5 you could simplify 0 === count(…) to be simply empty(…).

array_reduce + unset

if (0 === count(array_reduce(array_keys($source), 
    function($in, $key){ unset($in[array_search($key, $in)]); return $in; }, 
    ['story', 'message', '…'])))
{
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}

Harder to read, easy to change. array_reduce() uses a callback to iterate over an array to arrive at a value. By feeding the keys we're interested in the $initial value of $in and then removing keys found in source we can expect to end with 0 elements if all keys were found.

The construction is easy to modify since the keys we're interested in fit nicely on the bottom line.

array_filter & in_array

if (2 === count(array_filter(array_keys($source), function($key) { 
        return in_array($key, ['story', 'message']); }
    )))
{
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}

Simpler to write than the array_reduce solution but slightly tricker to edit. array_filter is also an iterative callback that allows you to create a filtered array by returning true (copy item to new array) or false (don't copy) in the callback. The gotchya is that you must change 2 to the number of items you expect.

This can be made more durable but verge's on preposterous readability:

$find = ['story', 'message'];
if (count($find) === count(array_filter(array_keys($source), function($key) use ($find) { return in_array($key, $find); })))
{
  // all keys found
} else {
  // not all
}
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If you have something like this:

$stuff = array();
$stuff[0] = array('story' => 'A story', 'message' => 'in a bottle');
$stuff[1] = array('story' => 'Foo');

You could simply count():

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (count($value) == 2) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // only story
  }
}

This only works if you know for sure that you ONLY have these array keys, and nothing else.

Using array_key_exists() only supports checking one key at a time, so you will need to check both seperately:

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (array_key_exists('story', $value) && array_key_exists('message', $value) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // either one or both keys missing
  }
}

array_key_exists() returns true if the key is present in the array, but it is a real function and a lot to type. The language construct isset() will almost do the same, except if the tested value is NULL:

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (isset($value['story']) && isset($value['message']) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // either one or both keys missing
  }
}

Additionally isset allows to check multiple variables at once:

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (isset($value['story'], $value['message']) {
    // story and message
  } else {
    // either one or both keys missing
  }
}

Now, to optimize the test for stuff that is set, you'd better use this "if":

foreach ($stuff as $value) {
  if (isset($value['story']) {
    if (isset($value['message']) {
      // story and message
    } else {
      // only story
    }
  } else {
    // No story - but message not checked
  }
}
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Does this not work?

array_key_exists('story', $myarray) && array_key_exists('message', $myarray)
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2  
Constants cannot be arrays... :) –  Sven Nov 1 '12 at 1:13
    
I always forget the $ when not writing in my super code checking autocomplete IDE. =) –  Kiwi Nov 2 '12 at 18:13
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This is the function I wrote for myself to use within a class.

<?php
/**
 * Check the keys of an array against a list of values. Returns true if all values in the list
 is not in the array as a key. Returns false otherwise.
 *
 * @param $array Associative array with keys and values
 * @param $mustHaveKeys Array whose values contain the keys that MUST exist in $array
 * @param &$missingKeys Array. Pass by reference. An array of the missing keys in $array as string values.
 * @return Boolean. Return true only if all the values in $mustHaveKeys appear in $array as keys.
 */
    function checkIfKeysExist($array, $mustHaveKeys, &$missingKeys = array()) {
        // extract the keys of $array as an array
        $keys = array_keys($array);
        // ensure the keys we look for are unique
        $mustHaveKeys = array_unique($mustHaveKeys);
        // $missingKeys = $mustHaveKeys - $keys
        // we expect $missingKeys to be empty if all goes well
        $missingKeys = array_diff($mustHaveKeys, $keys);
        return empty($missingKeys);
    }


$arrayHasStoryAsKey = array('story' => 'some value', 'some other key' => 'some other value');
$arrayHasMessageAsKey = array('message' => 'some value', 'some other key' => 'some other value');
$arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey = array('story' => 'some value', 'message' => 'some value','some other key' => 'some other value');
$arrayHasNone = array('xxx' => 'some value', 'some other key' => 'some other value');

$keys = array('story', 'message');
if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasStoryAsKey, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasStoryAsKey has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasStoryAsKey does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasMessageAsKey, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasMessageAsKey has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasMessageAsKey does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasStoryMessageAsKey does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

if (checkIfKeysExist($arrayHasNone, $keys)) { // return false
    echo "arrayHasNone has all the keys<br />";
} else {
    echo "arrayHasNone does NOT have all the keys<br />";
}

I am assuming you need to check for multiple keys ALL EXIST in an array. If you are looking for a match of at least one key, let me know so I can provide another function.

Codepad here http://codepad.viper-7.com/AKVPCH

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1  
The solution is fine but there's a nice one-line gem buried: if (0 === count(array_diff(['key1','key2','key3'], array_keys($lookIn)))) { // all keys exist } else { // nope } –  Mark Fox Apr 22 at 0:17
    
What you write is true. I do find my function more readable though verbose. Of course, I could be mistaken. Thanks for commenting on my answer. I learn something new. –  Kim Stacks Apr 22 at 7:22
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