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I have

a = [price1, price2]
b = [[108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830], [3926, 4095, 426]]

How can I automate assigning a[0] equal to b[0], and a[1] to b[1]?

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2  
How is what you want to do different from a = b? –  BrenBarn Nov 1 '12 at 1:35
1  
What do you mean by automate? Your question seems not clear enough. –  xiaohan2012 Nov 1 '12 at 1:35
    
If price1 and price2 are variables whose values you want to change, you're coming at the problem from an odd direction. Why not just use b[0] wherever you would have used price1? If that's not what you're trying to do, then I'm afraid I don't understand. –  Mark Reed Nov 1 '12 at 1:39
    
It's just as a way to clarify what I'm working with. I'd like to be able to do price1 = [108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830] without having to manually say that. –  user1709173 Nov 1 '12 at 1:41

3 Answers 3

I think you are trying to do something like this

b = [[108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830], [3926, 4095, 426]]
price1, price2 = b

or all on one line

price1, price2 = [[108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830], [3926, 4095, 426]]

Another possibility is to create a mutable object with an attribute to hold the price

>>> class Price(object):
...     def __init__(self, value=None):
...         self.value = value
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return "Price({})".format(self.value)
... 
>>> price1 = Price()
>>> price2 = Price()
>>> a = [price1, price2]
>>> b = [[108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830], [3926, 4095, 426]]
>>> for i,j in zip(a, b):
...     i.value = j
... 
>>> a
[Price([108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830]), Price([3926, 4095, 426])]
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In your "all on one line", you don't even need the outer []. (i.e., you can unpack a tuple instead of a list). –  mgilson Nov 1 '12 at 2:19

Do you want to associate the strings in a with the values in b? IE the name price1 to the first element in b? If so you want a dictionary:

 d = {}
 # i is the current position in a
 # key is the value at that position
 for i, key in enumerate(a):
     d[key] = b[i]

Do you just want to overwrite whats in b with a? Its as simple as

 a[0]=b[0]

or

 a = b
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3  
dict(zip(a, b)) would be much more Pythonic. Assuming that's what he actually wants. –  Lukas Graf Nov 1 '12 at 1:40

Not real clear what you're looking for, how about this:

>>> price1 = 10000
>>> price2 = 22222
>>> a = [price1, price2]
>>> b = [[108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830], [3926, 4095, 426]]
>>>
>>> merged_ab = {a_item: b_item for a_item, b_item in zip(a,b)}
>>> merged_ab
{10000: [108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830], 22222: [3926, 4095, 426]}
>>>

Actually, zip() alone does this without the keying.

>>> zip(a,b)
[(10000, [108455, 106406, 103666, 101408, 98830]), (22222, [3926, 4095, 426])]
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1  
No need for a dictionary comprehension (which is Python3+). dict(zip(a, b)) is all that's needed. –  Lukas Graf Nov 1 '12 at 1:43
    
Lukas, yes dict(zip(a,b)) does the same thing, however, dictionary comprehensions are available in 2.7 as well. –  monkut Nov 1 '12 at 2:42
    
you're right about dict comprehensions and 2.7 - how sweet is that? :) –  Lukas Graf Nov 1 '12 at 6:25

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