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I have this output data:

10dvex1_miRNA_ce.out.data|3331
10dvex1_misc_RNA_ce.out.data|0
10dvex1_rRNA_ce.out.data|60
10dvex1_snoRNA_ce.out.data|895
10dvex1_snRNA_ce.out.data|2127
11dvex1_miRNA_ce.out.data|3367
11dvex1_misc_RNA_ce.out.data|0
11dvex1_rRNA_ce.out.data|54
11dvex1_snoRNA_ce.out.data|839
11dvex1_snRNA_ce.out.data|1770
12dvex1_miRNA_ce.out.data|3321
12dvex1_misc_RNA_ce.out.data|0
12dvex1_rRNA_ce.out.data|50
12dvex1_snoRNA_ce.out.data|854
12dvex1_snRNA_ce.out.data|1821

I want to convert this output in this format, like as table:

`Fragment \t miRNA \t misc_RNA \t rRNA \t snRNA \t snoRNA`
 10 \t 3331 \t 0 \t 60 \t 2127 \ 895 \n
 11 \t 3367 \t 0 \t 54 \t 1770 \t 839 \n
 12 \t 3321 \t 0 \t 50 \t 1821 \t 854 \n

I need to use this table as Input to R. Some ideas? I try with perl with this script, but the result aren´t good:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

open(MYINPUTFILE, $ARGV[0]); # open for input
my @lines = <MYINPUTFILE>; # read file into list
print "Frag"."\t"."miRNA"."\t"."misc_RNA"."\t"."rRNA"."\t"."snRNA"."\t"."snoRNA"."\n";
foreach my $lines (@lines){
    my $pattern = $lines;
    $pattern =~ s/(.*)dvex\d_(.*)_(.*)\|(.*)/$1 $2  $4/g;
    print $1."\t".$4;
}
close(MYINPUTFILE);
exit;

And the result:

Frag    miRNA   misc_RNA    rRNA    snRNA   snoRNA
10  333110  010 6010    89510   212711  336711  011 5411    83911   177012  332112  012 5012

Isn't the idea.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code works. It will wrap when the fragment number changes. It assumes that the order of the data always corresponds with the order of the headers.

open(MYINPUTFILE, $ARGV[0]); # open for input
my @lines = <MYINPUTFILE>; # read file into list
print "Frag"."\t"."miRNA"."\t"."misc_RNA"."\t"."rRNA"."\t"."snRNA"."\t"."snoRNA";
my $frag = '';
foreach my $line (@lines){
    if ( $line =~ /^(\d+)dvex.*\|(\d+)/ ) {
        my $fr = $1;
        if ( $fr ne $frag ) {
            print "\n$fr";
            $frag = $fr;
        }
        print "\t".$2;
    }
}
print "\n";
close(MYINPUTFILE);
exit;

Output looks like:

Frag    miRNA   misc_RNA        rRNA    snRNA   snoRNA
10      3331    0       60      895     2127
11      3367    0       54      839     1770
12      3321    0       50      854     1821
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent result! thanks a lot! I'm perl begginer, but im very excited. Thanks. –  Cristian Velandia Nov 1 '12 at 5:14
    
be careful with this, though, the order of the input file must match the header order. Upon closer inspection, the above output has the columns snoRNA and snRNA swapped. A better script would extract the headers from the data file and not care what order it was in. –  broc.seib Nov 1 '12 at 5:30
    
The O'Reilly "Programming Perl" book by Wall, Christiansen, & Schwartz is still the best IMHO. –  broc.seib Nov 1 '12 at 5:31

It looks like you are just missing a carriage return in your print statement. E.g.,

print $1."\t".$4."\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe, but, the result is printed now in one column, i need to print the values in their respective column (or in their respective RNA). –  Cristian Velandia Nov 1 '12 at 4:47
    
ah, I see. You'll have to trigger when the "group" changes, e.g. from 10 -> 11, etc. This trigger will have you print the "group", and a carriage return. Are you guaranteed that the order of the lines in the data file will always be in the same order as you headers? –  broc.seib Nov 1 '12 at 4:57
    
The order can change, in this particular case, the order is for column 1, but it can be change with a preliminar 'sort -n' with bash commands...any other idea? –  Cristian Velandia Nov 1 '12 at 5:02

Something like this:

print $1."\t".$4;
print "\n" if ($2 eq "snRNA");

Break the line whenever you get the pattern "snRNA";

share|improve this answer

This one doesn't care what order the file is in, and extracts the headers from the data. The strategy is to accumulate the data into a structure, then output everything at once after all the data has been examined. If you have really (REALLY) big files, you could eat up memory.

open(MYINPUTFILE, $ARGV[0]); # open for input
my @lines = <MYINPUTFILE>; # read file into list
close(MYINPUTFILE);

## parse the data
my $types_found = {};
my $data = {};
foreach my $line (@lines){
    if ( $line =~ /^(\d+)dvex\d+_(.+)_ce\.out\.data\|(\d+)/ ) {
        $types_found->{$2} = '';
        $data->{$1}{$2} = $3;
    }
}

## print the header
my @types = sort keys %$types_found;
print "Frag";
foreach my $type ( @types ) {
    print "\t" . $type;
}
print "\n";

## print the rows
foreach my $frag ( sort keys %$data ) {
    print $frag;
    foreach my $type ( @types ) {
        print "\t" . $data->{$frag}{$type};
    }
    print "\n";
}

output:

Frag    miRNA   misc_RNA        rRNA    snRNA   snoRNA
10      3331    0       60      2127    895
11      3367    0       54      1770    839
12      3321    0       50      1821    854
share|improve this answer

Here's another option that orders the columns as requested by the OP:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash;
my @header = qw (Frag miRNA misc_RNA rRNA snRNA snoRNA);

/(\d+).+?_(.+)_ce.+\|(.+)/ and $hash{$1}{$2} = $3 for <>;

print +( join "\t", @header ) . "\n";

for my $key ( sort { $a <=> $b } keys %hash ) {
    my @line;
    push @line, $hash{$key}{ $header[$_] } for 1 .. $#header;
    print +( join "\t", $key, @line ) . "\n";
}

Output:

Frag    miRNA   misc_RNA    rRNA    snRNA   snoRNA
10  3331    0   60  2127    895
11  3367    0   54  1770    839
12  3321    0   50  1821    854
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