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I have a program that maintains an integer vector. I have three functions that add an integer, remove an integer and check whether an integer is already in the vector. The problem is with the last one.

vector<int> children;
void CtpTestingApplication::addChild(int child)
{
    for (int i=0; i<children.size(); i++)
    {
    //already a child
    if (children[i]==child)
        return;
    }
    //child not yet recorded
   children.push_back(child);
   cout<<"added child "<<child;
}

void CtpTestingApplication::removeChild(int child)
{
   for (int i=0; i<children.size(); i++)
   {
    //already a child, remove it
    if (children[i]==child)
    {
        children.erase(children.begin()+i);
        cout<<"removed child "<<child;
    }
   } 
   //not recorded, no need to remove
}

bool CtpTestingApplication::isChild(int child)
{
   vector<int>::iterator ic;
   bool result = false;
   for (ic= children.begin(); ic < children.end(); ic++)
   {
     cout<<*ic<<" vs "<<child;
  //     if (child==*ic)
         result = true;
   }
   return result;
}

I always get segmentation fault when I uncomment "if (child==*ic)", even though printouts show that the vector is not empty and contains the expected integers.

For example, with the if statements commented, I can see 1 vs 4, 2 vs 4, 4 vs 4, 12 vs 4

I also attempted looping using children[i] and so on, but to no avail. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

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1  
Can you provide a minimal compilable example program that exhibits this behaviour? There is nothing in the given code that would lead to a segmentation fault. –  Mankarse Nov 1 '12 at 5:04
2  
Your removeChild() method has "issues" - once you do a delete it will "left shift" all the members to "fill the gap", so you won't actually check the next member. This is only a problem if you can have duplicates. If you can't, then why not break the loop after you've found a match? –  John3136 Nov 1 '12 at 5:07
    
Sorry, I wish I could. This is part of a huge (working) program I am slowly editing. I simplified the issue as much I could, the entire program has over a dozen separate files that are too tightly coupled. –  user1790374 Nov 1 '12 at 5:07
3  
Instead of figuring out the problem with this code, replace it -- you're trying to use std::vector to produce a functional equivalent of std::set. Unless you have a really good reason to do otherwise, just use std::set and be done with it. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 1 '12 at 5:10
    
always try to make sure your iterator is valid before doing something on it –  billz Nov 1 '12 at 5:11

2 Answers 2

Your loop should change from this:

   for (ic= children.begin(); ic < children.end(); ic++)

to this:

  for (ic= children.begin(); ic != children.end(); ic++)

This won't solve the problem because the container used is a vector and taking the difference between iterators of vectors is defined for that container class. However, it's still good practice to prefer,

ic != container.end()

because that will work for containers that lack that definition.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, I tried it, but still not working. Thank you nonetheless. –  user1790374 Nov 1 '12 at 5:28
    
@user1790374 This is the correct answer. If the problem persists, you are doing something else wrong which isn't included in the pasted source. –  nurettin Nov 1 '12 at 5:33
    
sashang and @pwned: care to explain why changing < to != would solve the problem? –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 1 '12 at 5:36
    
This isn't the problem, vector iterators support pointer arithmetic (random access category) . Though what you suggested is good advice :) –  Mr.Anubis Nov 1 '12 at 5:46
    
You chaps are right, this won't solve the problem for a vector container... If pointer arithmetic is supported then 'less than' comparisons should work. –  sashang Nov 1 '12 at 5:49

As John3136 indicated, the only potential problem I see is with the removeChild function. Try re-writing it like so:

void CtpTestingApplication::removeChild(int child)
{
   int i=0; 
   while (i<children.size())
   {         
      if (children[i]==child) {
         children.erase(children.begin()+i);             
         continue;
      }
      i++;
   }        
}

Why you get the segfault is anyone's guess. One possibility is that the removeChild() can be called inside some other thread, invalidating your iterator in isChild(). This would only be possible if you are using threads without proper mutexing (in which case you have a far bigger problem :)

share|improve this answer
    
the problem is with isChild() –  Aniket Nov 1 '12 at 5:13
    
everyone. Thank you very much for all your help and suggestions (especially at such late hours). I replaced the vector with set and that finally solved the problem. I realize it wasn't the best solution, but it would have to do. –  user1790374 Nov 1 '12 at 5:50
    
@Aniket: Just because you're seeing the segfault in the isChild function does not mean the problem is there. Other functions that stuff up the container, like the erroneous removeChild function, could setup the isChild function for failure. –  sashang Nov 1 '12 at 5:59

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