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I need to trim strings if there is a word where coming at the end of string. What is the fast performing approach in C# for this?

Note: The word to trim can be anything.. WHERE is just an example

string text1 = "My hosue where sun shines";  //RESULT: "My hosue where sun shines"
string text2 = "My where"; //RESULT: "My"
string text3 = "My where I WHERE"; //RESULT:"My where I"
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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can use string.EndsWith method and string.Substring

public static string Trim(this string s, string trimmer)
{

    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(s)|| String.IsNullOrEmpty(trimmer) ||!s.EndsWith(trimmer,StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
        return s;
    else
        return s.Substring(0, s.Length - trimmer.Length);
}
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This is a LINQ variant through an extension method:

public static string TrimEnd(this string s, string trimmer)
{
    //reverse the original string we are trimmimng
    string reversed = string.Concat(s.Reverse());
    //1. reverse the trimmer (string we are searching for)
    //2. in the Where clause choose only characters which are not equal in two strings on the i position
    //3. if any such character found, we decide that the original string doesn't contain the trimmer in the end
    if (trimmer.Reverse().Where((c, i) => reversed[i] != c).Any())
        return s; //so, we return the original string
    else //otherwise we return the substring
        return s.Substring(0, s.Length - trimmer.Length);
}

and use it:

string text1 = "My hosue where sun shines";  
string text2 = "My where"; 
string text3 = "My where I WHERE"; 
Console.WriteLine(text1.TrimEnd("where"));
Console.WriteLine(text2.TrimEnd("where"));
Console.WriteLine(text3.TrimEnd("WHERE"));
Console.ReadLine();

It's case-sensitive. To make it case-insensitive you'll need to make both s and trimmer in the extension method low or high case.

Besides it will work even if you are searching for some phrase, not a single word only.

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Thanks... For the benefit of others can you explain the logic in plain English too? (like what is the check in if condition) –  Lijo Nov 1 '12 at 6:25
    
@Lijo surely, I'll edit my post in a minute –  horgh Nov 1 '12 at 6:26
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You can do it with regular expressions:

Regex.Replace(s, @"(\A|\s+)where\s*\Z", "", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase).Trim();

Usage:

"My hosue where sun shines".TrimWhere() // "My hosue where sun shines"
"My where".TrimWhere()                  // "My"
"My where I WHERE".TrimWhere()          // "My where I"
"".TrimWhere()                          // ""
"My blahWHERE".TrimWhere()              // "My blahWHERE"
"Where".TrimWhere()                     // ""

For this sample I created extension method (add System.Text.RegularExpressions namespace)

public static class StringExtensions
{
   public static string TrimWhere(this string s)
   {
      if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
          return s;

      return Regex.Replace(s, @"(\A|\s+)where\s*\Z", "", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
                  .Trim();
   }
}
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1  
Does this trim it for the case "blablaWHERE" ? –  mostruash Nov 1 '12 at 6:34
1  
@mostruash thanks, good catch - I have added \s+ to pattern –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 1 '12 at 6:39
2  
Also if single word where should be also trimmed, you need pattern (\A|\s+)\where\s*\Z –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 1 '12 at 6:43
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Use a case-insensitve EndsWith method call to determine if your string ends with the characters you want to trim and if it does remove from the end of the string the number of characters in the trim string.

In a method it might look like this:

private string MyTrimEnd(string s, string trimString) {
    if (s.EndsWith(trimString, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) {
        // A case-insenstive check shows the string ends with the trimString so remove from the
        // end of the string the number of characters in the trimString.  
        // Trim the result to leave no trailing space characters, if required.
        return s.Remove(s.Length - trimString.Length).Trim();
    } else {
        // The check showed the passed string does not end with the trimString so just return the
        // passed string.
        return s;
    }
}

Tests and results:

Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd(text1, "where"));      // 'My hosue where sun shines'
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd(text2, "where"));      // 'My'
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd(text3, "where"));      // 'My where I'
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd("WHERE", "where"));    // ''
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd("WHE", "where"));      // 'WHE'
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd("blablaWHERE", "where"));  //'blabla'
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd(string.Empty, "where"));  //''
Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", MyTrimEnd("WHEREwherE", "where"));  //'WHERE'

Or as an extension method:

public static string MyTrimEnd(this string s, string trimString) {
    if (s.EndsWith(trimString, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) {
        return s.Remove(s.Length - trimString.Length).Trim();
    } else {
        return s;
    }
}
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+1 Shame on me, I forgot about EndsWith at all –  horgh Nov 1 '12 at 6:47
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First you split the string to an array and check the last array element, and replace the string with the array elements itself.

string[] words1 = text1.Split(' ');
string replaced_string = "";
if words1[words1.length-1]=='where'
for (int i = 0; i < length-2; i++)  
{
         replaced_string + words1[i] + " ";
}
replaced_string.TrimEnd();
text1 = replaced_string;

You can do the same for other text strings as well.

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Another version of @Konstantin Vasilcov answer is

    public static string MyTrim1(string commandText, string trimmer)
    {

        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(commandText) || String.IsNullOrEmpty(trimmer))
        {
            return commandText;
        }

        string reversedCommand = (string.Concat(commandText.Reverse())).ToUpper();
        trimmer = trimmer.ToUpper();

        if (trimmer.Reverse().Where((currentChar, i) => reversedCommand[i] != currentChar).Any())
        {
            return commandText;
        }

        else
        {
            return commandText.Substring(0, commandText.Length - trimmer.Length);
        }

    }
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