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I was asked this question in an interview.

I have a method say public int add(int i, int j) and this method is already being used by many clients.

Now i have to make an update (may be some enhancement) to the add method which creates a scenario where i have to throw an exception. How can i make the existing clients to continue use the add() method without code change from their end? [Interviewer gave a hint: Clients may or may not use whatever new enhancement I made in add method]

First, I thought of overloading add, wrapping add in a new add method which throws exception. Then i thought of throwing Exception as RuntimException from add...

But none of them accepted as a correct approach.

Any pattern or design approach i am missing?

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2 Answers

Approach 1: Make use of Wrapper Class Integer

public class B {
    public int add(int i, int j) {
        return 0;
    }

    public int add(Integer i, Integer j) throws Exception {
        return 0;
    }
}

Approach 2: Make use of Overriding

You can take the advantage of overriding method can choose not to throw exception at all.

What you can do is declare Parent class which will have method with exception and childclass which does not have exception which will override method from parent. Now when you want clients to use add with exception pass reference with type A else pass reference with type B

class A {<---New Class
    public int add(int i, int j) throws Exception {<-- Method with Exception
        return 0;
    }
}

class B extends A { <----Original Class
    @Override
    public int add(int i, int j) { <--- Original Method
        return 0;
    }
}
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So you are suggesting that B is the original class and it should be modified to have a new parent class, A which exhibits the new behaviour and throws the exception? How is this possible if clients are already using instances of B? –  Duncan Nov 1 '12 at 8:37
    
@DuncanJones Clients may or may not use whatever new enhancement I made in add method It is the hint in the question. which means B can be kept as it is. There are no changes in B except extends from A so Code will compile as it is if library is released with A –  AmitD Nov 1 '12 at 8:49
    
Yes, that hint is confusing. You can use the hint to justify almost anything. In your example (which is helpful, by the way!) the client would need to adjust their code to use A if they want the new functionality. They could just as easily adjust their code to call addX instead of add, where addX is the new functionality. I suspect, however, your answer may be what they are looking for. –  Duncan Nov 1 '12 at 9:09
    
-1: This answer not the question because the OP says add() throws an exception. Client manipulate an instance of B. They doesn't know anything about A. If B.add() calls super.add() the code never compiles. –  Aubin Nov 1 '12 at 15:05
    
@Aubin This is just illustration if you have factory then client can not know which instance is being used. What is the point in specifying same answer which OP already know –  AmitD Nov 1 '12 at 15:11
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You could add new add(int i, int j, boolean isOldClient) method and throw runtime exception if client is not old. (Maybe use some better name instead of isOldClient).

Then do something like this

// legacy method
public int add(int i, int j) {
    return add(i, j, true);
}

// new add method
public int add(int i, int j, boolean isOldClient) {
    ...
    if (!oldClient) {
       ...                          // add code that throw exception
       throw new RuntimeException();
    }
    ...
}

New Clients could use the new add method with an extra parameter.

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