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I have a dictionary with color settings and tried this:

#define ColorWithString( x) [UIColor #x]

NSDictionary *settings = @{@"color" : @"whiteColor"};
UIColor *color = ColorWithString(settings[@"color"]);

I get an error Expected identifier.

I know there are some subtleties with string preprocessing. Maybe it is not even possible to send a dynamic message to a class. Any suggestions to make this work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at what your macro expands to:

UIColor *color = [UIColor settings[@"color"]];

That’s obviously not legal Objective-C code. I think you could use performSelector: in combination with NSSelectorFromString:

UIColor *color = [UIColor performSelector:
    NSSelectorFromString(settings[@"color"])];

…but why not do simply this?

NSDictionary *colors = @{
    @"white" : [UIColor whiteColor],
    @"red"   : [UIColor redColor]
};
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Very good suggestions. I have a configuration plist with many colors, many of which are defined as convenient categories on UIColor, such as [UIColor goldColor], or [UIColor colorWithHex:@"#00AA00"] etc., so this is not quite working yet... –  Mundi Nov 1 '12 at 8:56
    
If I had the colors in an external configuration file, I guess I would opt to store the hex values and parse them, because a direct translation of configuration values to selector names sounds like trouble. If you don’t mind that, I think you can take the NSSelectorFromString way I suggested in the answer. –  zoul Nov 1 '12 at 9:27
    
Thought about doing it exactly in this way (hex values). Thanks for your input. –  Mundi Nov 1 '12 at 9:28
    
Actually his macro expands to UIColor *color = [UIColor "settings[@\"color\"]"];. –  jcayzac Nov 21 '12 at 0:58

Change your Macro to

#define ColorWithString( x) [UIColor performSelector:NSSelectorFromString(x)]

And then you can use macro as

        NSDictionary *settings = @{@"color" : @"greenColor"};        
        UIColor *color = ColorWithString(settings[@"color"]);

To get a CGColorRef from a UIColor

CGColorRef colorRef = color.CGColor;
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I keep getting an cryptic error, no stack trace, but in the thread CGColorSpaceGetModel... –  Mundi Nov 1 '12 at 9:14
    
the output is UIColor. I think what you need is a CGColorRef. Try assigning color.CGColor instead of color directly. –  Shineeth Hamza Nov 1 '12 at 9:22
    
OK, that is a separate question... Sort of solved already. -- The macro works, but the performSelector was @zoul's idea ;-). –  Mundi Nov 1 '12 at 9:27

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