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Sorry about the vague title and tags since this question is quite specific.

I'm not a big scripter or coder in any way. I run a website which needs certain results to be updated a couple of times per week. The results are created by special software and is exported in either one of these formats; html, pdf, doc, xls, rpt, ttx, csv, odbc, rec, rtf or xml.

Since my website uses a table which has a different layout than the exported files, I currently copy and paste the information between my and tags. I takes only a couple of minutes but I am wondering how to automate this? The exported files look like this:

1    John and George    12
2    Peter and Suzan    10
3    Allan and Ed        8

and needs to be somesthing in the line of this:

<table width="100%" cellspacing="0" class="tabels" id="top">
<tr>
<td colspan="3" class="tabel"><b> Groupp A</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="tabel"><strong> 1. </strong></td>
<td class="tabel">John and George</td>
<td class="tabel">12</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="tabel"><strong>2.</strong></td>
<td class="tabel">Peter and Suzan</td>
<td class="tabel">10</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="tabel"><strong> 3. </strong></td>
<td class="tabel">Allan and Ed</td>
<td class="tabel">8</td>
</tr>

This might be very basic. I suppose a couple of find and replace commands should do the trick. I have tried using Notepad++ but I wonder how you guys would handle this? I can use a linux or windows machine.

share|improve this question
    
small typo: "tabel" should probably read "table" – Micha Wiedenmann Nov 1 '12 at 9:26
    
If you just need a one time solution, and you happen to use the editor vim, you can record commands and repeat them, see :help 10.1, :help q, :help @. – Micha Wiedenmann Nov 1 '12 at 9:35

Here's a Linux sed solution:

sed 's|\([0-9]*\) *\(.*[^ ]\)  *\([0-9]*\)$|<tr><td class="tabel"><strong>\1.</strong></td><td class="tabel">\2</td><td class="tabel">\3</td></tr>|' filename > filename.html

This just deals with the table rows. Everything else looks like static boilerplate that you should be able to generate with echo commands in the script.

share|improve this answer

I'd use awk for something like this (although any of the test processing tools, like Perl, would be equally up to the task).

First the input file:

pax> cat testprog.in

1    John and George    12
2    Peter and Suzan    10
3    Allan and Ed        8

Then, the awk script itself:

pax> cat testprog.awk

BEGIN {
    print "<table width=\"100%\" cellspacing=\"0\" class=\"tabels\" id=\"top\">"
    print "  <tr>"
    print "    <td colspan=\"3\" class=\"tabel\"><b> Groupp A</b></td>"
    print "  </tr>"
}
{
    print "  <tr>"
    print "    <td class=\"tabel\"><strong>" $1 ".</strong></td>"

    str = ""; for (i = 2; i < NF; i++) str = str " " $i
    print "    <td class=\"tabel\">" substr (str,2) "</td>"

    print "    <td class=\"tabel\">" $NF "</td>"
    print "  </tr>"
}
END {
    print "</table>"
}

Then, a sample run so you can see it working:

pax> awk -f testprog.awk testprog.in

<table width="100%" cellspacing="0" class="tabels" id="top">
  <tr>
    <td colspan="3" class="tabel"><b> Groupp A</b></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="tabel"><strong>1.</strong></td>
    <td class="tabel">John and George</td>
    <td class="tabel">12</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="tabel"><strong>2.</strong></td>
    <td class="tabel">Peter and Suzan</td>
    <td class="tabel">10</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="tabel"><strong>3.</strong></td>
    <td class="tabel">Allan and Ed</td>
    <td class="tabel">8</td>
  </tr>
</table>

As to how it works, that's explained below.

The BEGIN and END clauses simply control what gets printed before and after the processing of the lines in the input file. That's the table stuff itself and the first row.

For each line, you first print out a tr tag and a td tag containing the first word on the line.

Then you construct another td line based on the middle arguments, collapsing spaces in the process.

The a final td with the final argument on the line, and a closing tr, and there you have it. Move on to the next line.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. The last couple of days I've been messing with awk, very interessting. I'm slowly learning how to use it. I still have a couple issues. I use the following line: { if(NR=$1<4) {print" "$1" "$4" "$(NF-1)" "} ;} to print only the first three scores. Sometimes there are two people with the same score and the input will be: 1 Pete 2 Alan (3) John (3) Charles Is there a smart way to only show the first of the two (John in this case)? – user1788586 Nov 5 '12 at 20:33
    
@user1788586, yes, there is. However, you'll get a better response if you ask that as a a separate question. That way, the full power of the SO swarm will descend on you with answers, and it will better assist others with a similar problem in future. – paxdiablo Nov 5 '12 at 22:10

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