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I have an abstract page class looking like this:

abstract class Page {
    public static function display() {
        self::displayHeader();
        self::displayContent();
        self::displayFooter();
    }

    public static function displayContent() {
        print "<p>some content</p>";
    }

    public static function displayHeader() {
        include_once(kContent . "HeaderContent.class.php");
        HeaderContent::display();
    }

    public static function displayFooter() {
        include_once(kContent . "FooterContent.class.php");
        FooterContent::display();
    }
};

I would like to subclass from this, and only override the displayContent method, so the header and footer is being displayed automatically, but still having the option to override the display method, for example for .js files.

Now I have another class, looking like this:

class FooPage extends Page {
    public static function displayContent() {
        print "<p>Foo page</p>";    
};

Now, instead of calling the FooPage's displayContent method, it just calls the one from the superclass.

Why? What can I do?

EDIT

I'm running PHP 5.2.17

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6  
Use static instead of self. –  air4x Nov 1 '12 at 9:41
    
possible duplicate of when using self, parent, static and how? –  deceze Nov 1 '12 at 9:42
    
not a duplicate, didn't work for me. –  NSAddict Nov 1 '12 at 9:44
2  
Why is the display() method static? Don't do it, if you already have an object. And then inheritance works with $this. –  Sven Nov 1 '12 at 10:22
1  
Then you don't get inheritance in return. :) B::foo() will pass through to A:foo() due to static binding and it will look to A::foo() as if it was called directly. Nothing really you can do about it. –  deceze Nov 1 '12 at 10:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ilija, PHP < 5.3 doesn't have "Late Static Binding" and that's why you may be experiencing the FooPage::displayContent not being called. If you are running PHP 5.2 then there is nothing much to do (except for some hacks using debug_backtrace(), which honestly I wouldn't recommend for this situation).

Now, what it really calls my attention is that your methods are all satic; is there a reason for this? Why aren't they instance methods? I would expect something like:

include_once(kContent . "HeaderContent.class.php");
include_once(kContent . "HeaderContent.class.php");

abstract class Page 
{
    protected $header;
    protected $footer;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->header = new HeaderContent();
        $this->footer = new FooterContent();
    }

    public function display() 
    {
        $this->displayHeader();
        $this->displayContent();
        $this->displayFooter();
    }

    public function displayContent() 
    {
        print "<p>some content</p>";
    }

    public function displayHeader() 
    {
        $this->header->display();
    }

    public function displayFooter() 
    {
        $this->footer->display();
    }
};

class FooPage extends Page 
{
    public function displayContent() 
    {
        print "<p>Foo page</p>";
    }
}

and later in your view you would write something like:

$page = new FooPage();
$page->display();

Some things to take into account:

  • It is generally better not to use print/echo when generating a view content. Instead try to create the string and do the print/echo as a last step. This make easier to later write tests.

Example:

public function display() 
{
    return 
           $this->displayHeader() . 
           $this->displayContent() . 
           $this->displayFooter();
}

public function displayContent() 
{
    return "<p>some content</p>";
}

public function displayHeader() 
{
    return $this->header->display();
}
....
$page = new FooPage();
echo $page->display();
  • If you need to do it as your app grows, you can pass the header and footer as Page constructor parameters. As long as they are objects that understand the display() message (i.e. polymorphic) things should be ok.

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your answer! Ok, it worked with non-static methods. What I do with printing out is following: ob_start(); $this->output = ob_get_contents(); ob_get_clean(); Is this too dirty? –  NSAddict Nov 1 '12 at 12:22
    
This was meant, so I can print stuff out by closing the php tags, inserting my html code, and opening the php tags again. So I get syntax highlighting. –  NSAddict Nov 1 '12 at 12:23
1  
Well, that's a most of all a matter of taste and each person's view on "elegant" coding. I prefer leaving the ob_start(); mechanism for times when it is the only choice. From my POV returning a string is a more elegant approach, at the cost of loosing syntax highlighting. As many other things is programming there is always a trade-off and you should choose the one that fits best your needs. However, if you go with the ob_start() approach I would advise to create a "output grabber" object that encapsulates that in a method, so that you don't repeat the ob_* process N times. –  Andrés Fortier Nov 1 '12 at 13:23
    
Ok, many thanks –  NSAddict Nov 1 '12 at 15:23

It's a VERY, very bad idea to write HTML code inside script. Use templates, where whole html page will be defined, it will save you lot of time and bugs and problems of growing.

As example: http://twig.sensiolabs.org/

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1  
Why is outputting HTML like this bad? Yes, it's less structured, but it's not "very very bad", at least in my opinion. –  NSAddict Nov 1 '12 at 9:56
1  
@OZ_, where is logic is the given example ? There is only presentation. –  theredled Nov 1 '12 at 10:01
1  
@OZ_ : no, it's only PHP. –  theredled Nov 1 '12 at 10:02
2  
@OZ_ : ok, that last argument just killed me, you win. –  theredled Nov 1 '12 at 10:12
2  
Presentation code does not need to be dumb! As long as the code is only responsible for presenting, there's no problem of it containing any amounts of non-HTML code. A "dumb template" is one way, it's not the only way. Even when using Twig or Smarty, there's a ton of code for parsing those template formats! That's part of the presentation code too! And traditional HTML mixed with PHP is fine too, as long as it only outputs HTML and doesn't "do" anything. –  deceze Nov 1 '12 at 10:20

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