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Imagine that MyOpenedFile is something wrapping file with opened streams. Then suppose this code:

// method in an Util class
static void safeClose(MyOpenedFile f) {
  if (f != null) {
    try {
      f.close();
    } catch(IOException ex) { /* add logging or console output */ }
  }
}

Actual method for the question:

void doSomeFileOperation(...) throws IOException, ... {
    MyOpenedFile f1 = null;
    MyOpenedFile f2 = null;
    try {

      /* method's "business logic" code beings */
      f1 = new MyOpenedFile(...);
      //do stuff
      f2 = new MyOpenedFile(...);
      // do stuff
      f1.close(); f1 = null;
      // do stuff with f1 closed
      f2.close(); f2 = null;
      // do stuff with f2 closed
      /* method's "business logic" code ends */

    } finally {
      Util.safeClose(f1); f1 = null;
      Util.safeClose(f2); f2 = null; 
    }
}

Now this is quite messy and especially error-prone (some code in finally block might be very hard to get called in unit tests, for example). For example in C++, destructor would take care of cleanup (either getting called by scoped pointer destructor or directly) and code would be much cleaner.

So, is there better/nicer/cleaner way to wrap above piece of business logic code, so that any exceptions get propagated but both files f1 and f2 get closed (or at least close is attempted on both, even if it fails)?

Also answers pointing to any open source libraries such as Apache Commons, providing nice wrappers are welcome.

share|improve this question
    
btw, your code sample has a mistake in it that will actually cause you to leak file handles because you set f1=null before you close it. –  Chii Nov 1 '12 at 10:15
    
@Chii No it doesn't, as far as I can see. There's close or safeClose before all null assignments. –  hyde Nov 1 '12 at 10:18
    
Why do you call close twice per file (in try and in finally)? –  home Nov 1 '12 at 10:19
    
@home I do not. I just want the dummy business logic describing a case which closes a file and sets reference to null. If reference is null in finally block, nothing is done to it. –  hyde Nov 1 '12 at 10:20
    
@hyde: ah i misread your sample. Which is interesting because its really easy to misread code written with this style of interspersed logic with housekeeping. But then, you cannot rewrite it because of the requirement that f1 be closed while f2 is kept open (otherwise, you could rewrite the sample in such a way that the logic is passed in, and the housekeeping squirreled away elsewhere –  Chii Nov 1 '12 at 10:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A file is a wrapper for a String which contains a file name which may or may not exist. It is stateless so you don't need to close it.

A resource you need to close is FileInputStream or BufferedReader and you can close these implicitly with ARM in Java 7

try(BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file))) {

}

This will close br whent he block exits.

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/trywithresources-401775.html

share|improve this answer
1  
I chose to accept your answer for being most to the point, and with IMO good code sample (sometimes small is beautiful), thank you. Now all that remains for me is, I need to find out if I can use Java7 for the actual thing... :-/ –  hyde Nov 1 '12 at 10:46

Take a look at The try-with-resources Statement which will close resources after the try-block ends.

The File class you use does not seem to be java.io.File because it does not have any close() method. In that case make sure that your own File class implements Closeable to make it work with ARM.

try (FileInputStream f1 = new FileInputStream("test1.txt");
     FileInputStream f2 = new FileInputStream("test2.txt")) {
    // Some code
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks pointing out the File thing, I changed class name and added comment to question explaining the logic behind custom class name. –  hyde Nov 1 '12 at 10:34
1  
One nitpick, more like general ranting not directed at you: I think that kind of catch blocks should be used very rarely. It is almost always bad idea to just catch exception, log it, and continue as if nothing happened. If exception can be safely ignored, logging it is just clutter. If action needs to be taken, then it should be more than just logging it (like, pop up a dialog in GUI app). Mostly exception should be allowed to propagate up, sometimes as a cause of another more relevant exception. Just logging is useful mostly when programmer is unsure of the right thing to do. –  hyde Nov 1 '12 at 10:53

You dont need to close Files (which are representations of files on the file system) as mentioned here:

Do I need to close files I perform File.getName() on?

I assume you are asking more about the File Streams/Readers?

In which case java 7 has a nice new feature: http://www.vineetmanohar.com/2011/03/java-7-try-with-auto-closable-resources/

If you are working on an older version of java I'd just keep it simple with this:

void doSomeFileOperation(...) throws IOException, ... {
  FileInputStream f1 = null;
  FileInputStream f2 = null;
  try {

    // do stuff

  } finally {
    Util.safeClose(f1); 
    Util.safeClose(f2); 
  }
}
share|improve this answer

An option that comes automatically to my head is: Separate the code that handles files, from the code that does any processing. In this way you can encapsulate the nasty code that handles does the open, close and exception handling.

The other bit is that the sample you have does a lot of extra, unneeded steps

void doSomeFileOperation(...) throws IOException, ... {
    File f1 = null;
    File f2 = null;
    try {
      f1 = new File(...);
      f2 = new File(...);
      // callback to another class / method that does the real work
    } finally {
      Util.safeClose(f1);
      Util.safeClose(f2);
    }
}

You don't need to set the File instances to null. If you try to use them, you'll get an exception.

I don wonder what File object you're using. The standard File class in java doesn't have a close() method.

share|improve this answer
    
i initially thought the same, but the flaw is that the requirement that // do stuff with f1 closed is no longer kept. You'd need to pass in two different callbacks, and so this didn't really fix the problem. –  Chii Nov 1 '12 at 10:29
    
Yes, depending on exact business code, the cleanup could be optimized. But this leads to different boilerplate code for different cases, which might be even worse. –  hyde Nov 1 '12 at 10:36

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