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In a desperate attempt to switch from Matlab to python, I am encountering the following problem:

In Matlab, I am able to define a matrix like:

N = [1  0  0  0 -1 -1 -1  0  0  0;% A
     0  1  0  0  1  0  0 -1 -1  0;% B
     0  0  0  0  0  1  0  1  0 -1;% C
     0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0  0 -1;% D
     0  0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  1;% E
     0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  1  1]% F

The rational basis nullspace (kernel) can then be calculated by:

K_nur= null(N,'r')

And the orthonormal basis like:

K_nuo= null(N)

This outputs the following:

N =

 1     0     0     0    -1    -1    -1     0     0     0
 0     1     0     0     1     0     0    -1    -1     0
 0     0     0     0     0     1     0     1     0    -1
 0     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0    -1
 0     0     0    -1     0     0     0     0     0     1
 0     0    -1     0     0     0     0     0     1     1


K_nur =

 1    -1     0     2
-1     1     1     0
 0     0     1     1
 0     0     0     1
 1     0     0     0
 0    -1     0     1
 0     0     0     1
 0     1     0     0
 0     0     1     0
 0     0     0     1


K_nuo =

 0.5933    0.1332    0.3070   -0.3218
-0.0930    0.0433    0.2029    0.7120
 0.1415    0.0084    0.5719    0.2220
 0.3589    0.1682   -0.0620    0.1682
-0.1628    0.4518    0.3389   -0.4617
 0.3972   -0.4867    0.0301   -0.0283
 0.3589    0.1682   -0.0620    0.1682
-0.0383    0.6549   -0.0921    0.1965
-0.2174   -0.1598    0.6339    0.0538
 0.3589    0.1682   -0.0620    0.1682

I have been trying to replicate this in Python SAGE, but so far, I have had no success. My code looks like this:

st1= matrix([
[ 1, 0, 0, 0,-1,-1,-1, 0, 0, 0],
[ 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1,-1, 0],
[ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0,-1],
[ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1],
[ 0, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
[ 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1]])

print st1

null2_or= transpose(st1).kernel()
null2_ra= transpose(st1).kernel().basis()

print "nullr2_or"
print null2_or
print "nullr2_ra"
print null2_ra

Note: The transpose was introduced after reading through some tutorials on this and has to do with the nature of SAGE automatically computing the kernel from the left (which in this case yields no result at all).

The problem with this now is: It DOES print me something... But not the right thing.

The output is as follows:

sage: load stochiometric.py
[ 1  0  0  0 -1 -1 -1  0  0  0]
[ 0  1  0  0  1  0  0 -1 -1  0]
[ 0  0  0  0  0  1  0  1  0 -1]
[ 0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0  0 -1]
[ 0  0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  1]
[ 0  0 -1  0  0  0  0  0  1  1]
nullr2_or
Free module of degree 10 and rank 4 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[ 1  0  0  1  0  0  1  1 -1  1]
[ 0  1  0  1  0 -1  1  2 -1  1]
[ 0  0  1 -1  0  1 -1 -2  2 -1]
[ 0  0  0  0  1 -1  0  1  0  0]
nullr2_ra
[
(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, -1, 1),
(0, 1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 1, 2, -1, 1),
(0, 0, 1, -1, 0, 1, -1, -2, 2, -1),
(0, 0, 0, 0, 1, -1, 0, 1, 0, 0)
]

Upon closer inspection, you can see that the resulting kernel matrix (nullspace) looks similar, but is not the same.

Does anyone know what I need to do to get the same result as in Matlab and, if possible, how to obtain the orthonormal result (in Matlab called K_nuo).

I have tried to look through the tutorials, documentation etc., but so far, no luck.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this should work:

sage: st1= matrix([
[ 1, 0, 0, 0,-1,-1,-1, 0, 0, 0],
[ 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1,-1, 0],
[ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0,-1],
[ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1],
[ 0, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
[ 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1]])
sage: K = st1.right_kernel(); K
Free module of degree 10 and rank 4 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[ 1  0  0  1  0  0  1  1 -1  1]
[ 0  1  0  1  0 -1  1  2 -1  1]
[ 0  0  1 -1  0  1 -1 -2  2 -1]
[ 0  0  0  0  1 -1  0  1  0  0]
sage: M = K.basis_matrix()

The gram_schmidt method gives a pair of matrices. Type M.gram_schmidt? to see the documentation.

sage: M.gram_schmidt() # rows are orthogonal, not orthonormal
(
[     1      0      0      1      0      0      1      1     -1      1]
[    -1      1      0      0      0     -1      0      1      0      0]
[  5/12    3/4      1    1/6      0    1/4    1/6  -1/12    5/6    1/6]
[ 12/31 -25/62   4/31  -9/62      1 -29/62  -9/62  10/31  17/62  -9/62],

[    1     0     0     0]
[    1     1     0     0]
[ -7/6  -3/4     1     0]
[  1/6   1/2 -4/31     1]
)
sage: M.gram_schmidt()[0] # rows are orthogonal, not orthonormal
[     1      0      0      1      0      0      1      1     -1      1]
[    -1      1      0      0      0     -1      0      1      0      0]
[  5/12    3/4      1    1/6      0    1/4    1/6  -1/12    5/6    1/6]
[ 12/31 -25/62   4/31  -9/62      1 -29/62  -9/62  10/31  17/62  -9/62]
sage: M.change_ring(RDF).gram_schmidt()[0] # orthonormal
[  0.408248290464              0.0              0.0   0.408248290464              0.0              0.0   0.408248290464   0.408248290464  -0.408248290464   0.408248290464]
[            -0.5              0.5              0.0              0.0              0.0             -0.5              0.0              0.5              0.0              0.0]
[  0.259237923683   0.466628262629   0.622171016838   0.103695169473              0.0    0.15554275421   0.103695169473 -0.0518475847365   0.518475847365   0.103695169473]
[  0.289303646409   -0.30135796501  0.0964345488031  -0.108488867403   0.747367753224  -0.349575239411  -0.108488867403   0.241086372008   0.204923416206  -0.108488867403]

The matrix st1 has integer entries, so Sage treats it as a matrix of integers, and tries to do as much as possible with integer arithmetic, and failing that, rational arithmetic. Because of this, Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization will fail, since it involves taking square roots. This is why the method change_ring(RDF) is there: RDF stands for Real Double Field. You could instead just change one entry of st1 from 1 to 1.0, and then it will treat st1 as a matrix over RDF from the start and you won't need to do this change_ring anywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
Doggone it, John, I was just in the middle ;-) I'll just add a clarification below. –  kcrisman Nov 1 '12 at 16:21
    
Thank you very much. These explanations helped me a lot. Especially this warning about the rational and integer arithmetic. I will try to use this more often. –  Mark Anderson Nov 5 '12 at 15:20
    
You might also consider posting Sage questions to ask.sagemath.org. I think more Sage users and developers read that site than this one. –  John Palmieri Nov 5 '12 at 17:46
    
Hi John. Thanks for the additional comment. I will do that in the future. –  Mark Anderson Nov 5 '12 at 19:22
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There might be a way do this with SAGE builtin functions; I'm not sure.

However, if a numpy/python-based solution will do, then:

import numpy as np

def null(A, eps=1e-15):
    """   
    http://mail.scipy.org/pipermail/scipy-user/2005-June/004650.html
    """
    u, s, vh = np.linalg.svd(A)
    n = A.shape[1]   # the number of columns of A
    if len(s)<n:
        expanded_s = np.zeros(n, dtype = s.dtype)
        expanded_s[:len(s)] = s
        s = expanded_s
    null_mask = (s <= eps)
    null_space = np.compress(null_mask, vh, axis=0)
    return np.transpose(null_space)

st1 = np.matrix([
    [ 1, 0, 0, 0,-1,-1,-1, 0, 0, 0],
    [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1,-1, 0],
    [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0,-1],
    [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1],
    [ 0, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
    [ 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1]])

K = null(st1)
print(K)

yields the orthonormal null space:

[[ 0.59330559  0.13320203  0.30701044 -0.32180406]
 [-0.09297005  0.04333798  0.20286425  0.71195719]
 [ 0.14147329  0.00837169  0.5718718   0.22197807]
 [ 0.35886225  0.16816832 -0.06199711  0.16817506]
 [-0.16275558  0.45177747  0.33887617 -0.46165922]
 [ 0.39719892 -0.48674377  0.03013138 -0.0283199 ]
 [ 0.35886225  0.16816832 -0.06199711  0.16817506]
 [-0.03833668  0.65491209 -0.09212849  0.19649496]
 [-0.21738895 -0.15979664  0.63386891  0.05380301]
 [ 0.35886225  0.16816832 -0.06199711  0.16817506]]

this confirms the columns have the null space property:

print(np.allclose(st1*K, 0))
# True

and this confirms that K is orthonormal:

print(np.allclose(K.T*K, np.eye(4)))
# True
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thank you very much indeed for your great answer. I'd love to give more than one upvote, but unfortunately, I can't... This really explains it all. –  Mark Anderson Nov 5 '12 at 15:18
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To expand on John's great answer, I think you just have two different bases for the same vector space. Note his use of right_kernel.

sage: st1= matrix([
....: [ 1, 0, 0, 0,-1,-1,-1, 0, 0, 0],
....: [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1,-1, 0],
....: [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0,-1],
....: [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0,-1],
....: [ 0, 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
....: [ 0, 0,-1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1]])
sage: st2 = matrix([[1,-1, 0, 2],
....: [-1, 1, 1, 0],
....: [ 0, 0, 1, 1],
....: [ 0, 0, 0, 1],
....: [ 1, 0, 0, 0],
....: [ 0,-1, 0, 1],
....: [ 0, 0, 0, 1],
....: [ 0, 1, 0, 0],
....: [ 0, 0, 1, 0],
....: [ 0, 0, 0, 1]])
sage: st2 = st2.transpose()
sage: st2
[ 1 -1  0  0  1  0  0  0  0  0]
[-1  1  0  0  0 -1  0  1  0  0]
[ 0  1  1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0]
[ 2  0  1  1  0  1  1  0  0  1]
sage: st1.right_kernel()
Free module of degree 10 and rank 4 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[ 1  0  0  1  0  0  1  1 -1  1]
[ 0  1  0  1  0 -1  1  2 -1  1]
[ 0  0  1 -1  0  1 -1 -2  2 -1]
[ 0  0  0  0  1 -1  0  1  0  0]
sage: st2.row_space()
Free module of degree 10 and rank 4 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[ 1  0  0  1  0  0  1  1 -1  1]
[ 0  1  0  1  0 -1  1  2 -1  1]
[ 0  0  1 -1  0  1 -1 -2  2 -1]
[ 0  0  0  0  1 -1  0  1  0  0]

Your spaces are the same, just different bases in Sage and Matlab.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for expanding and explaining this further to me. I have to admit I am not too well versed in matrix magic, so I didn't consider this possibility. –  Mark Anderson Nov 5 '12 at 15:21
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