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I use INCR and EXPIRE to implement rate limiting(for the example below, only allow 5 requests per mintues):

if EXISTS counter
    count = INCR counter
else
    EXPIRE counter 60
    count = INCR counter

if count > 5
    print "Exceeded the limit"    

But there is a problem that a people can send 5 requests at the last second at a minute and 5 other requests at the first second at the next minute, in other words, 10 requests in two seconds.

Is there any better way to avoid the problem?


Update: I came up with an idea just now: use a Lists to implement it.

times = LLEN counter
if times < 5
    LPUSH counter now()
else
    time = LINDEX counter -1
    if now() - time < 60
        print "Exceeded the limit"
    else
        LPUSH counter now()
LTRIM counter 5

Is it a good way?

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Yes, that's a valid and good solution. Even better than using sets ;) –  alto Nov 1 '12 at 22:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could switch from "5 requests in the last minute" to "5 requests in minute x". By this it would be possible to do:

counter = current_time # for example 15:03
count = INCR counter
EXPIRE counter 60 # just to make sure redis doesn't store it forever

if count > 5
  print "Exceeded the limit"

If you want to keep using "5 requests in the last minute", then you could do

counter = Time.now.to_i # this is Ruby and it returns the number of milliseconds since 1/1/1970
key = "counter:" + counter
INCR key
EXPIRE key 60

number_of_requests = KEYS "counter"*"
if number_of_requests > 5
  print "Exceeded the limit"

If you have production constraints (especially performance), it is not advised to use the KEYS keyword. We could use sets instead:

counter = Time.now.to_i # this is Ruby and it returns the number of milliseconds since 1/1/1970
set = "my_set"
SADD set counter 1

members = SMEMBERS set

# remove all set members which are older than 1 minute
members {|member| SREM member if member[key] < (Time.now.to_i - 60000) }

if (SMEMBERS set).size > 5
  print "Exceeded the limit"

This is all pseudo Ruby code, but should give you the idea.

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Usage of the keys command is not advised. –  Linus G Thiel Nov 1 '12 at 12:32
    
Your are right. But we know nothing yet about any production relevant constraints. Nevertheless, I edited my answer to use Redis sets instead. –  alto Nov 1 '12 at 22:07

Your update is a very nice algorithm, although I a made couple of changes:

times = LLEN counter
if times < 5
    LPUSH counter now()
else
    time = LINDEX counter -1
    if now() - time <= 60
        print "Exceeded the limit"
    else
        LPUSH counter now()
        RPOP counter
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Here is an alternative approach. If the goal is to limit the number of requests to X requests per Y seconds with the timer starting when the first request is received, then you could create 2 keys for each user that you want to track: one for the time that the first request was received and another for the number of requests made.

key = "123"
key_count = "ct:#{key}"
key_timestamp = "ts:#{key}"

if (not redis[key_timestamp].nil?) && (not redis[key_count].nil?) && (redis[key_count].to_i > 3)
    puts "limit reached"
else
    if redis[key_timestamp].nil?
        redis.multi do
            redis.set(key_count, 1)
            redis.set(key_timestamp, 1)
            redis.expire(key_timestamp,30)
        end
    else
        redis.incr(key_count)
    end
    puts redis[key_count].to_s + " : " + redis[key_timestamp].to_s + " : " + redis.ttl(key_timestamp).to_s
end
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