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i am looking for a pattern on how to achieve the following.

I have an Object called TestRunner, which is the main class that an external caller will call and which is responsible for instantiating different Test classes and will execute them.

The Test instances are stateless and shall be destroyed after each run.

Inside the Test instance I want to have a data access class instantiated though, which caches information it reads for the lifetime of the TestRunner instance and which shall be re-used for different Test executions.

So this means that my data access classes shall have the same lifetime like TestRunner, but they do not have a direct connection, only indirect via the temporary Test class.

What is a good way to achieve this? Somebody recommended a singleton for the data access class, but I do not like this, since it will preserve the state longer than I need it (longer than TestRunner lives).

Also please note that the data access classes are specific to each Test class, so it is not as simple as just making it a member variable of the TestRunner

I am asking strictly OO here, not using a specific language or framework.

Thanks! Bruno

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2 Answers 2

I think you might be looking for the Command Pattern.

This is your signature for a test:

public interface ITest
{
    void Execute();
}

Then you have your TestRunner class, getting its tests from another (test) provider, TestProvider:

public class TestRunner
{
    private readonly TestProvider _testProvider;

    public TestRunner(TestProvider testProvider)
    {
        _testProvider = testProvider;
    }

    public void RunAllTests()
    {
        foreach (ITest test in _testProvider.GetTests())
        {
            test.Execute();
        }
    }
}

A simple implementation for a test provider (using reflection) could be:

public class TestProvider
{
    public IEnumerable<ITest> GetTests()
    {
        IEnumerable<Type> AllTypes =
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().ToList()
                .SelectMany(s => s.GetTypes())
                .Where(p => typeof (ITest).IsAssignableFrom(p));
        foreach (Type typeToLoad in AllTypes)
        {
            if (!typeToLoad.IsInterface)
                yield return (ITest) Activator.CreateInstance(typeToLoad);
        }
    }
}

... but since you want dependencies in your Tests (such as data access), I would consider improving this to allow dependency injection... but for now this will do (Test2 won't work properly without an improved version of the test provider - using dependency injection)

So, here is a simple test

public class Test1 : ITest
{
    public void Execute()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("I'm test 1");
    }
}

And here is a more complicated test depending on other dependencies (so you need to implement dependency injection before this will work):

public class Test2 : ITest
{
    private IDataSource ds;

    public void Execute()
    {
        ds.Store("I'm test 2");
    }
}

This is far from perfect (I'm open to criticism), but I hope this gives you a good starting point.

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First of all, if the Test instances are stateless, there is no point in not reusing them.

It looks to me like you should pass some TestRunnerContext instance, or the TestRunner instance itself, to each of the Test instances. These instances could then add their data access class instances to this context, for later reuse. The TestRunnerContext instance would be created by the TestRunner, and have the same lifetime.

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Thanks for the answer... maybe I made a mistake by saying that it is stateless. Actually it is stateful, but the data must be gone when running it again (so either cleared or the whole object recreated, which seems better to me). –  Bruno Haller Nov 1 '12 at 14:46

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