Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Im a beginner in java, this is a simple calculator code which i made with the help of a tutorial. This works just fine, but as you can see their is no "constructor" in this program! And their is only a scanner object! Can this program be more simplified in a way it has contructors and methods, as an example for me to learn ?

import java.util.Scanner; 
public class apples {
public static void main(String args[]){
    Scanner calculator = new Scanner(System.in);
    double fnum, snum, answer;

    System.out.println("Enter first number: ");
    fnum = calculator.nextDouble();
    System.out.println("Enter second number: ");
    snum = calculator.nextDouble();
    System.out.println("enter any operator: ");
    String op = calculator.next();
    switch (op){
    case ("x") :
        answer = fnum * snum;
        System.out.println(answer);
        break;

    case ("/") :
        answer = fnum / snum;
    System.out.println(answer);
    break;

    case ("+") :
        answer = fnum + snum;
    System.out.println(answer);
    break;

    case ("-") :
        answer = fnum - snum;
    System.out.println(answer);
    break;


    }

    }





}
share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Tomasz Nurkiewicz, codesparkle, Andrew Thompson, Thomas Jungblut, akappa Nov 1 '12 at 13:03

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
move it to Code Review please. –  codesparkle Nov 1 '12 at 11:28
2  
why is the class name apples ? you are making a calculator right? make a habit of using meaningful names –  Mukul Goel Nov 1 '12 at 11:28
2  
codereview.stackexchange.com –  John B Nov 1 '12 at 11:29
2  
This code is, if anything, already overly simplistic. So no, there's little point in trying to simplify it further. You could move the System.out.println to below the switch, that would save you three lines of repeated code. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 1 '12 at 11:31
1  
@codesparkle Without more requirements on the program, the OOP-ized solution will only acquire pointless complexity. Many times I found myself staring at a completely unmotivated piece of code in a book, wondering why one would write such a monstrosity when clearly much simpler solutions work. The sense of tension and release is key to good education, but achieving it is no trifling matter. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 1 '12 at 11:39

2 Answers 2

One idea could be use more functional style to reduce redundant operator and ugly case switches and make code more maintain-friendly:

import java.util.*;
public class apples {
    protected static final Map<String, BinOp> operators = new HashMap<String, BinOp>() {{
        put("+", new BinOp() { public double calc(double op1, double op2) { return op1 + op2; }; });
        put("-", new BinOp() { public double calc(double op1, double op2) { return op1 - op2; }; });
        put("x", new BinOp() { public double calc(double op1, double op2) { return op1 * op2; }; });
        put("/", new BinOp() { public double calc(double op1, double op2) { return op1 / op2; }; });
    }};
    public static void main(String args[]){
        Scanner calculator = new Scanner(System.in);
        double fnum, snum, answer;

        System.out.println("Enter first number: ");
        fnum = calculator.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("Enter second number: ");
        snum = calculator.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("enter any operator: ");
        String op = calculator.next();
        BinOp opFunction = operators.get(op);
        answer = opFunction.calc(fnum, snum);
        System.out.println(answer);
    }
}

interface BinOp {
    double calc(double op1, double op2);
}

Of course, you should handle not double values in input or non existent operators.

Another good idea is to separate logic:

import java.util.*;
public class apples {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        Scanner calculator = new Scanner(System.in);
        double fnum, snum, answer;

        System.out.println("Enter first number: ");
        fnum = calculator.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("Enter second number: ");
        snum = calculator.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("enter any operator: ");
        String op = calculator.next();
        answer = calc(op, fnum, snum);
        System.out.println(answer);
    }

    public static double calc(String op, double op1, double op2) {
        switch (op) {
            case ("+"): return op1 + op2;
            case ("-"): return op1 - op2;
            case ("x"): return op1 * op2;
            case ("/"): return op1 / op2;
        }
        throw new RuntimeException("Not implemented!");
    }
}

It make your code more readable and also maintainable.

And because I really like enums:

import java.util.*;
public class apples {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        Scanner calculator = new Scanner(System.in);
        double fnum, snum, answer;

        System.out.println("Enter first number: ");
        fnum = calculator.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("Enter second number: ");
        snum = calculator.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("enter any operator: ");
        String op = calculator.next();
        Operation operator = Operation.get(op);
        answer = operator.calc(fnum, snum);
        System.out.println(answer);
    }
}

enum Operation {
    ADD("+") {
        public double calc(double op1, double op2) {
            return op1 + op2;
        }
    },
    SUB("-") {
        public double calc(double op1, double op2) {
            return op1 - op2;
        }
    },
    MUL("x") {
        public double calc(double op1, double op2) {
            return op1 * op2;
        }
    },
    DIV("/") {
        public double calc(double op1, double op2) {
            return op1 / op2;
        }   
    },
    ;

    Operation(String op) {
        this.op = op;
    }
    protected String op;
    public abstract double calc(double op1, double op2);
    public static Operation get(String op) {
        for (Operation operation : values()) {
            if (operation.op.equals(op)) {
                return operation;
            }
        }
        throw new RuntimeException("Not implemented!");
    }
}

You can use also on other places as:

answer = Operation.MUL(2, 3);

and easy iterate over all operations, get names etc.

share|improve this answer
    
i like the logic, the maintainable code :) Thanks ... but i haven't yet learned about "enum" .. :( –  Sharp Edge Nov 1 '12 at 13:17

UPDATED---------------------------------

Here's my solution ;):

The launcher(may be from servlet also for instance, whatever you want):

  public class Launcher {

    private final Scanner scanner;

    public Launcher(Scanner scanner) {
        this.scanner = scanner;
    }

    public Scanner getScanner() {
        return scanner;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Launcher launcher = new Launcher(new Scanner(System.in));
        launcher.printResult(launcher.takeOperandInput("first"), launcher.takeOperandInput("second"),
                launcher.takeOperatorInput());
    }

    private String takeOperandInput(String operandNumber) {
        askForOperand(operandNumber);
        return getElement();
    }

    private void askForOperand(String operand) {
        System.out.println("Enter " + operand + " :");
    }

    private String takeOperatorInput() {
        askForOperator();
        return getElement();
    }

    private void askForOperator() {
        System.out.println("enter any operator (+,-,/,*): ");
    }

    private String getElement() {
        return scanner.next();
    }

    private void printResult(String leftOperand, String rightOperand, String operator) {
        Calculator calculator = new Calculator(leftOperand, rightOperand, operator);
        System.out.println(calculator.calculate());
    }
}

Here the Calculator class:

public class Calculator {

    private final Operands operands;

    private final OperationType operationType;

    public Calculator(String leftOperand, String rightOperand, String operationType) {
        this.operands = new Operands(leftOperand,  rightOperand);
        this.operationType = OperationType.transform(operationType);;
    }

    public double calculate() {
        return operationType.calculate(operands);
    }
}

Here the immutable Operands class:

final class Operands {

    private final double leftOperand;

    private final double rightOperand;

    public Operands(String leftOperand, String rightOperand) {
        this.leftOperand = Double.parseDouble(leftOperand);
        this.rightOperand = Double.parseDouble(rightOperand);
    }

    public final double getLeftOperand() {
        return leftOperand;
    }

    public final double getRightOperand() {
        return rightOperand;
    }
}

Here the OperationType enum containing logic:

enum OperationType {

    ADDITION("+") {
        public double calculate(Operands operands) {
            return operands.getLeftOperand() + operands.getRightOperand();
        }
    },
    SUBTRACTION("-") {
        public double calculate(Operands operands) {
            return operands.getLeftOperand() - operands.getRightOperand();
        }
    },
    MULTIPLICATION("*") {
        public double calculate(Operands operands) {
            return operands.getLeftOperand() * operands.getRightOperand();
        }
    },
    DIVISION("/") {
        public double calculate(Operands operands) {
            return operands.getLeftOperand() / operands.getRightOperand();
        }
    };

    private String operationType;

    private OperationType(String operationType) {
        this.operationType = operationType;
    }

    abstract double calculate(Operands operands);

    static OperationType transform(String operationType) {
        for (OperationType ot : values()) {
            if (ot.operationType.equals(operationType)) {
                return ot;
            }
        }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unknown operator, please redo your operation.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In your example, if you add new operation, you touch 2 places: transform and calculate. Enums are more as simple value holders, see my example :). Another thing is to combine getElement, askForOperand and askForOperator into one function, for instance getElement(scanner : Scanner, askuser : String) : String because your Calculator constructor get 3 strings. –  Anton Bessonov Nov 1 '12 at 12:56
    
@Anton Bessonov Yes, you're right:) I haven't followed the Open/Closed principle in this little case :( Enum is likely to look like as an abstraction as interfaces are. In this case, OperationType would (or rather should) instigate a well-implemented Strategy Pattern. So that, when a new operator has to come, no need to touch to the calculator class but solely to OperationType enum. –  Mik378 Nov 1 '12 at 13:10
    
@Anton Bessonov I've just updated my code ;) –  Mik378 Nov 1 '12 at 14:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.