Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

begin
   @output_file = File.open("output.txt", "w")
   File.read(@input_file).each_line do |line|
   taxify_line(line)
end
rescue => e
   p "Smz went wrong..."
end
@output_file.write("Last line of output")
@output_file.close unless @output_file.nil?

What is the correct way of ensuring that regardless of I catch an exception, both files (@input_file and @output_file) are closed?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

rescue clause should be inside of begin..end block. And there's also, surprise, ensure clause that does exactly what you might think

begin
   @output_file = File.open("output.txt", "w")
   File.read(@input_file).each_line do |line|
     taxify_line(line)
   end
rescue => e
   p "Smz went wrong..."
ensure
  @output_file.write("Last line of output")
  @output_file.close unless @output_file.nil?
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. What if I don't want to write on the @output_file if something went wrong? So, avoid doing this: @output_file.write("Last line of output") -- Where should I place that line then? –  Hommer Smith Nov 1 '12 at 11:50
1  
In your main body (before rescue). –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 1 '12 at 11:51
    
I read the following in Pragmatic programming ruby book; and have become somewhat confused. Can some one please clear this up: #start_of_code f = File.open("testfile") begin # .. process rescue # .. handle error ensure f.close end #end_of_code "Beginners commonly make the mistake of putting the File.open inside the begin block. In this case, that would be incorrect, because open can itself raise an exception. If that were to happen, you wouldn’t want to run the code in the ensure block, because there’d be no file to close." –  Nosh Nov 16 '12 at 0:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.