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Consider the following kernel:

__kernel void histogramKernel(__global uint4 *Image,  ....)     
 {                         .
                     .
                     .
 const uint mask = (uint) (NBINS-1);  //NBINS=256
 uint4 temp = Image[idx];   
 uint4 temp2 = (temp & mask);
 temp = temp >> 8;
 temp2 = (temp & mask);
 . . .

 }

Suppose:

4 threads are running, idx=0,1,2,3 and Image[idx]=idx+100

What will be the value in temp2 in the last line?

Update:

Assume any suitable values for

 Image[0].x, Image[0].y, Image[0].z, Image[0].w
 Image[1].x, Image[1].y, Image[1].z, Image[1].w
 Image[2].x, Image[2].y, Image[2].z, Image[2].w
 Image[3].x, Image[3].y, Image[3].z, Image[3].w 
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2  
The title talks about atomics, and the body of the question asks about the value of temp2. But I don't see the value of temp2 being affected by the atomics. The effects of the atomics are limited to s in the code snippet. –  boiler96 Nov 2 '12 at 17:09
    
Ok you are right. Actually I have shown only a part of the entire code. anyways I am editing tile and code... –  gpuguy Nov 2 '12 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

We can completely eliminate atomics from this problem since the values of temp and temp2 do not depend on s.

__kernel void histogramKernel(__global uint4 *Image,  ....)     
 {                        
     //...                                   
     const uint mask = (uint) (NBINS-1);  //NBINS=256
     uint4 temp = Image[idx];   
     uint4 temp2 = (temp & mask);
     //...
     temp = temp >> 8;
     temp2 = (temp & mask);
     //...
 }

Finally the mask is equal to 0x000000FF so the values of temp are modded by 256 and put into temp2. temp2 is overwritten on the last line after the value of temp is right shifted by 8 bits. So we get the value of:

temp2 = (Image[idx] / 256) % 256

I can't tell from your question what Image is initialized to (since there are 4 values and you only seemed to give one).

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These are the 4 values: Image[idx]=idx+100 , so for idx=0, Image[o]=100, idx=1, Image[1]=101, idx=2, Image[2]=102, idx=3, Image[3]=100 –  gpuguy Nov 2 '12 at 18:39
    
Well what's the value of Image[0].x, Image[0].y, Image[0].z, Image[0].w? It's a uint4; every index should have 4 values. –  KLee1 Nov 2 '12 at 19:20
    
Plz assume suitable values... –  gpuguy Nov 3 '12 at 5:45
    
how many values temp2 will be having? 16?, assuming suitable values can you show me? –  gpuguy Nov 5 '12 at 3:42
    
Just substitute each of the values into the function I gave you and you should get the right answers. The math works individually on each element of the unit4. –  KLee1 Nov 5 '12 at 17:35

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