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An R question from a beginner:

I have a 'long' data frame with id and featureCode columns. The former contains primary keys to records; the latter, values of a categorical variable. Each record has between 1 and 9 values of the categorical variable. For example:

id  featureCode
5   PPLC
5   PCLI
6   PPLC
6   PCLI
7   PPL
7   PPLC
7   PCLI
8   PPLC
9   PPLC
10  PPLC

I'd like to calculate the number of times each feature code is used with the other feature codes (the "pairwise counts" of the title). At this stage, the order each feature code is used is not important. I envisage the result would be another data frame, where the rows and columns are feature codes, and the cells are counts. For example:

      PPLC  PCLI  PPL
PPLC  0     3     1
PCLI  3     0     1
PPL   1     1     0

Unfortunately, I don't know how to perform this calculation and I've drawn a blank when searching for advice (mostly, I suspect, because I don't know the correct terminology).

Thanks in advance for any help.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a data.table approach similar to @mrdwab

It will work best if featureCode is a character

library(data.table)

DT <- data.table(dat)
# convert to character
DT[, featureCode := as.character(featureCode)]
# subset those with >1 per id
DT2 <- DT[, N := .N, by = id][N>1]
# create all combinations of 2
# return as a data.table with these as columns `V1` and `V2`
# then count the numbers in each group
DT2[, rbindlist(combn(featureCode,2, 
      FUN = function(x) as.data.table(as.list(x)), simplify = F)), 
    by = id][, .N, by = list(V1,V2)]


     V1   V2 N
1: PPLC PCLI 3
2:  PPL PPLC 1
3:  PPL PCLI 1
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I was trying something along those lines but couldn't get past where you created DT2. –  Ananda Mahto Nov 2 '12 at 2:27
    
I it took me a while to realize that simplify = FALSE was an option, then to work out how to return a of the correct dimension data.table time. –  mnel Nov 2 '12 at 2:32
    
Thanks for the answer! –  Iain Dillingham Nov 2 '12 at 12:40

I would use SQL, in R it is available with the sqldf Package.

Extract all possible combinations something like:

sqldf("select distinct df1.featureCode, df2.featureCode
       from df df1, df df2       
       ")

Then you can extract the result elements:
(Maybe just use a for loop for all combinations)

PCLI - PPLC

sqldf("select count(df1.id)
       from df df1, df df2
       where df1.id = df2.id
       and df1.featureCode = 'PCLI' and df2.featureCode = 'PPLC'
       ")

PPLC - PPL

sqldf("select count(df1.id)
       from df df1, df df2
       where df1.id = df2.id
       and df1.featureCode = 'PPLC' and df2.featureCode = 'PPL'
       ")

PCLI - PPL

sqldf("select count(df1.id)
       from df df1, df df2
       where df1.id = df2.id
       and df1.featureCode = 'PCLI' and df2.featureCode = 'PPL'
       ")

There is for sure some easier solution out there especially if you got more combinations to consider. Maybe a search for contingency table helps you out.

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Unfortunately there are 90 or so feature codes in the dataset, so creating combinations manually would be too time consuming. Thanks for the suggestion, though. –  Iain Dillingham Nov 2 '12 at 12:41

If you don't need that exact structure, but just need to get the pairwise counts, you can try this approach:

Here's your data:

dat <- read.table(header = TRUE, 
       text = "id  featureCode
                5         PPLC
                5         PCLI
                6         PPLC
                6         PCLI
                7          PPL
                7         PPLC
                7         PCLI
                8         PPLC
                9         PPLC
               10         PPLC")

We're only interested in ids where there is more than one featureCode:

dat2 <- dat[ave(dat$id, dat$id, FUN=length) > 1, ]

Having this data as a list is going to be useful since it will let us use lapply to get the pairwise combinations.

dat2 <- split(dat2$featureCode, dat2$id)

This next step can be broken down into its intermediate sections if you prefer, but the basic idea is to create combinations of the vectors in each list item and then tabulate the unlisted output.

table(unlist(lapply(dat2, function(x) 
  combn(sort(x), 2, FUN = function(y) 
    paste(y, collapse = "+")))))
# 
#  PCLI+PPL PCLI+PPLC  PPL+PPLC 
#         1         3         1

Update: A better answer at another question

With a little bit of modification, @flodel's answer to another question is applicable here. It requires the igraph package to be installed (install.packages("igraph")).

dat2 <- dat[ave(dat$id, dat$id, FUN=length) > 1, ]
dat2 <- split(dat2$featureCode, dat2$id)
library(igraph)
g <- graph.edgelist(matrix(unlist(lapply(dat2, function(x) 
  combn(as.character(x), 2, simplify = FALSE))), ncol = 2, byrow=TRUE), 
                    directed=FALSE)
get.adjacency(g)
# 3 x 3 sparse Matrix of class "dgCMatrix"
#      PPLC PCLI PPL
# PPLC    .    3   1
# PCLI    3    .   1
# PPL     1    1   .
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Another solution, which is conceptually easy to follow, I think. You have a bipartite graph here, and simply need the projection of this graph onto the "featureCode" vertices. Here is how to do this with the igraph package:

dat <- read.table(header = TRUE, stringsAsFactors=FALSE,
                  text = "id  featureCode                                       
                          5         PPLC                                                  
                          5         PCLI                                                  
                          6         PPLC                                                  
                          6         PCLI                                                  
                          7          PPL                                                  
                          7         PPLC                                                  
                          7         PCLI                                                  
                          8         PPLC                                                  
                          9         PPLC                                                  
                         10         PPLC")

g <- graph.data.frame(dat, vertices=unique(data.frame(c(dat[,1], dat[,2]),
                          type=rep(c(TRUE, FALSE), each=nrow(dat)))))
get.adjacency(bipartite.projection(g)[[2]], attr="weight", sparse=FALSE)

#      PPLC PCLI PPL
# PPLC    0    3   1
# PCLI    3    0   1
# PPL     1    1   0
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