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What is the difference between the following configurations

Listen *:80 //anything at port 80
Listen 192.168.0.34:80 //from an internal ip on port 80
Listen 173.194.35.23:80 //from an external ip on port 80

Which of them is the best configuration (if there is any difference between them). I want my server to be accessed from internet not just from a LAN.

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closed as off topic by casperOne Nov 2 '12 at 14:35

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I always use *:80.

You can only listen on IPs that are actually bound to the network cards of your server but it's poor practice to have a server that straddle internal and external networks, IMHO, so I wouldn't define internal and external addresses.

The only time I think it is necessary to be specific about what IP address you listen on is if you have particular IP based virtual hosting.

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One Apache server can have multiple IPs for multiple domains.

Listen *:80 --> Apache listens no matter what ip request the web browser
Listen 192.168.0.34:80 ---> Apache listens only if web browser requests http://192.168.0.34 . 192.x.x.x use to be internal IPs
Listen 173.194.35.23:80 ---- Apache listens only if web browser requests http://Listen 173.194.35.23

listen *:80 is enough if you only have a site domain. The other configurations are to serve multiple sites/domains into one apache server.

Some documentation examples http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/vhosts/examples.html

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