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I'm working on my first Chrome extension. I have a default popup popup.html which loads popup.js.

I used serg's answer to Chrome's tabs.executeScript - passing parameters and using libraries? as inspiration for the popup->page interaction.

The problem is that the following click handler in popup.js works:

function click(e) {
    chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "loading" } );
    chrome.tabs.executeScript(null,
        {code:"globalVarName = {'scriptOptions': {...}};" },
        chrome.tabs.executeScript(null, {file: "js/script.js"},
            chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "done" } ))
    );
    window.close();
}

But the following does not:

function click(e) {
    chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "loading" } );
    chrome.tabs.executeScript(null,
        {code:"globalVarName = {'scriptOptions': {...}};" },
        chrome.tabs.executeScript(null, {file: "js/script.js"},
            function(){chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "done" } );})
    );
    window.close();
}

I want to be able to do more than one thing on completion.

Edit:

I've realised that the first case immediately executes chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText(), not when the script has finished executing. So that case can be ignored. I've reworded the question title to reflect this.

What I'm looking for is why the second case's callback doesn't execute at all.

share|improve this question
    
Once I got my facts straight, I realized the same thing. Are you sure script.js is actually executed without any errors? –  Jasper Nov 1 '12 at 13:21
    
I guessed that :). Yes. Well, it executes most of the time. Sometimes globalVarName isn't defined. I can add the contents of script.js to the question if you like. –  Adam Lynch Nov 1 '12 at 13:26
    
Are you also sure it executes all the way through? Putting an alert way at the end could help you find that out if you are having trouble with that. I think that experiment is far more useful than posting the code - either it works or it doesn't... –  Jasper Nov 1 '12 at 13:29
    
Good idea. It does. –  Adam Lynch Nov 1 '12 at 13:31
    
Hang on though, surely this will never work as you intend, shouldn't your second executeScript be wrapped in an anonymous function? As it's the callback from the initital executeScript?? –  urbananimal Nov 1 '12 at 13:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure the culprit here is window.close() which closes the popup. The same popup in which this code is executing (except script.js, that's executing on the actual page).

Therefore, the callback was never being executed. I'm only talking of course about case 2 here (see my edit to the question).

My latest fully working code for any future visitors:

var tabId = null;
function click(e) {
    chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "..." } );
    chrome.tabs.executeScript(tabId, 
        {code:"globalVarName= {...}" }, 
        function(){ 
            chrome.tabs.executeScript(tabId, {file: "js/script.js"},
                function(){chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "done" } );
                    setTimeout(function() { 
                        chrome.browserAction.setBadgeText ( { text: "" } ); 
                    }, 1000);
                }
            ); 
        } 
    );
}

Also note that the path to the script (script.js here) is relative to the extension source root, i.e. where the manifest.json is.

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