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Say I have this:

page_url                      | canvas_url
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.google.com/        | http://www.google.com/barfoobaz
http://www.google.com/foo/bar | http://www.google.com/foo

I'd like to find the row that is the start of my string ordered by the longest match. The problem I'm facing is finding the longest matching string, rather than just the row that matches that also has a matching one. I.e.

http://www.google.com/foo matches page_url in row 1 and canvas_url in row 2, but if it's length of both columns rather than a match it would think row 1 is the better match as canvas_url in row 1 is longer.

I could grab all matches and then filter the length in code doing something like:

SELECT *, LENGTH(canvas_url), LENGTH(page_url)
FROM app 
WHERE
    'http://www.google.com/foo' LIKE CONCAT(canvas_url, '%') OR
    'http://www.google.com/foo' LIKE CONCAT(page_url, '%')

Or perform 2 subselections grabbing the top matches of canvas_url respective page_url and then filter that to 1 in code, but I would prefer (barring any ridiculous performance issues) having the database just return what I need.

My immediate concern is MySQL but I need to target SQLite and Postgress, so I'd be happy with an answer in either of those.

Suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
I don't get it. Why does the page_url of row1 match http://www.google.com/hi? The page_url in row1 doesn't have hi at the end... Are you trying to find the url that has the most characters in common with your search string? Or somethign else? Perhaps you could expand on your example to more clearly show what strings match what urls, and then what makes one url prefered over another url? –  MatBailie Nov 1 '12 at 13:13
    
@Dems Ah got spotting, I thought myself into a corner. I'll fix that. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 13:15
    
@Dems Updated with better examples, sorry about that. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 13:22
    
In your new example, you don't state that the search string matches the canvas_url in row1. I assume that you do count that as a match? Also, which RDBMS are you using? MySQL, SQL-Server, Oracle? –  MatBailie Nov 1 '12 at 13:28
    
@Dems - Right again, I was inverting my lookup, it should've been '<url>' LIKE '<column_content>%' too see if the URL is columns content is the start of the string. MySQL would be ideal. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This will work to get the longest actual match length (not just the longest url in the record):

-- Get page_url matches
SELECT *, LENGTH(page_url) AS MatchLen
FROM app 
WHERE 'http://www.google.com/foo' LIKE CONCAT(page_url, '%') -- can't tell from question if this should be reversed
UNION ALL
-- Get canvas_url matches
SELECT *, LENGTH(canvas_url) AS MatchLen
FROM app 
WHERE 'http://www.google.com/foo' LIKE CONCAT(canvas_url, '%')
-- Bring the longest matches to the top
ORDER BY MatchLen DESC -- May need to add a tie-breaker here
LIMIT 1

Here is a running example on SqlFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
The CONCAT has to be on the column since I want to know if the column value is the start of my string rather than the string being the start of the column value. The UNION idea is pretty dope though. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 15:18
    
@KitSunde, then I don't see how any canvas_url is a match. –  Tim Lehner Nov 1 '12 at 15:30
    
Ah yeah it was matching page_url on row two. I swapped the values in the example. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 15:40
    
100% correct, thanks! –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 16:24

Maybe you just need something like this?

SELECT page_url as url, LENGTH(page_url) as len
FROM pages WHERE 'http://www.google.com/foo' LIKE CONCAT(page_url, '%')
UNION
SELECT canvas_url as url, LENGTH(canvas_url) as len
FROM pages WHERE 'http://www.google.com/foo' LIKE CONCAT(canvas_url, '%')
ORDER BY len DESC
LIMIT 1
share|improve this answer
    
order by len desc? –  Tim Lehner Nov 1 '12 at 15:27
    
thank you for your comment... order by desc... well not exactly, it's not clear how to count the longest match, but i think i have an idea now, i'll edit my answer –  fthiella Nov 1 '12 at 15:31
    
Yes, I'm confused by the question and the example matches given. That said, there may need to be a tie-breaker in the order by as well. –  Tim Lehner Nov 1 '12 at 15:32
    
I'm still undecided of how to order the results... maybe now it's better! –  fthiella Nov 1 '12 at 15:37
    
Your original answer was correct, btw. Except I guess I wanted the ordering to be DESC, but that's minor detail. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 15:46

If you need to find just the first row, you want an order by and limit. You have to be a bit clever about how to arrange it:

SELECT *, LENGTH(canvas_url), LENGTH(page_url)
FROM app 
WHERE canvas_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo' '%') OR
      page_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo', '%')
order by (case when canvas_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo' '%') and
                    page_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo', '%') and
                    LENGTH(canvas_url) < LENGTH(page_url)
               then LENGTH(page_url)
               when canvas_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo' '%') and
                    page_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo', '%') and
                    LENGTH(canvas_url) >= LENGTH(page_url)
               when canvas_url like concat('http://www.google.com/foo' '%')
               then LENGTH(canvas_url)
               else LENGTH(page_url)
          end)
limit 1

This is ordering by the longer of the matching strings, and then returning exactly one row. Note that LIMIT is not standard, so different databases have different mechanisms for returning one row.

share|improve this answer
    
This sorts by the longest url, not the longest matched url. Also, the LIKE predicate seems reversed to me. –  Tim Lehner Nov 1 '12 at 15:17
    
I had no idea case even existed so that's pretty cool. LIMIT should work in all 3 databases I'm targeting. CONCAT however does not so for ANSI SQL enabled databases (Postgress, SQLite) I use ||, while MySQL doesn't support || without enabling ansi support. –  Kit Sunde Nov 1 '12 at 15:23
    
order by GREATEST(LENGTH(page_url), LENGTH(canvas_url)) ? –  fthiella Nov 1 '12 at 15:41
    
@fthiella . . . GREATEST() is not standard SQL and may not be available in all the databases. –  Gordon Linoff Nov 1 '12 at 15:43
    
@TimLehner . . . You are correct on both accounts. I had used the logic in the question, clearly without reviewing it. The logic in the order by was just wrong. –  Gordon Linoff Nov 1 '12 at 15:46

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