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i have a question. I need to add a text line into a txt file. This is my file:

  • 000
  • 001 test1
  • 002 test2
  • 003 test3
  • 004
  • 005 test4
  • 006 test5
  • 007 test6

I need with bash scripting to add text in line 000 and 004.

How can i do? Thanks to all!

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Are the numbers actually present in the file? –  amaurea Nov 1 '12 at 13:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the "sed" tool to acheive your goal. It is quite powerful for manipulating files. You can use a command like this:

sed -i /your/file.txt -e "s/000/000'\n'YOUR_NEW_LINE/"
sed -i /your/file.txt -e "s/004/004'\n'YOUR_NEW_LINE/"

(If I understand correctly, you have "000" at the begining of the first line of your file, and "004" for the fifth one)

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Ok thank you so much this work. But i have a problem, i need to inseret new line in fisrt blanck line. How i can do? Thanks a lot –  NikM Nov 1 '12 at 14:16
    
The number of line is posted by gedit, but in file there aren't line number –  NikM Nov 1 '12 at 14:20

That's what the sed and ed utilities are for. They use the same set of commands with some minor differences. Major difference is that ed edits a file and takes commands on standard input while sed takes commands on command-line and edits standard input to standard output.

Using sed is usually more convenient except when you hit something that it can't do due to it's streaming nature like moving text around.

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This can be done in native bash with a while/read loop:

while read num cmt; do
  if [[ -z cmt ]] ; then
    printf '%s test%s\n' "$num" "$num"
  else
    echo "$num $num"
  fi
done <infile.txt >outfile.txt
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awk 'NR==1{print $0, "Foo"}NR==5{print $0, "Bar"}'
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