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I'm trying to send an email using my godaddy hosting.

I've also given away the username and password (as you can see in the code) for the testing email account so if anyone has the time, can they try and send an email using these settings? I'm totally at a brick wall.

I've got Thunderbird setup and it connects and sends emails fine using the settings below, but when I run this peice of code, it just times out. If Thunderbird can send email to this server then it must be my code. It's really frustrating.

SmtpClient ss = new SmtpClient();

try {
  ss.Host = "smtpout.secureserver.net";
  ss.Port = 465;
  ss.Timeout = 10000;
  ss.DeliveryMethod = SmtpDeliveryMethod.Network;
  ss.UseDefaultCredentials = false;
  ss.Credentials = new NetworkCredential("testingaccount@comicidolonline.com", "abc123", "comicidolonline.com");
  ss.EnableSsl = true;

  MailMessage mailMsg = new MailMessage("testingaccount@comicidolonline.com", "youremail@youremail.com", "subject here", "my body");
  mailMsg.DeliveryNotificationOptions = DeliveryNotificationOptions.OnFailure;
  ss.Send(mailMsg);

  Console.WriteLine("Sent email");
  Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this question
    
Where is this code running from? I have a problem sending emails to my GoDaddy accounts because my server's IP address is blacklisted. If you can check the Mail Error folder, it should give you a reason why it failed. –  Martin Aug 28 '09 at 16:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+100

Since you are asking how to send email, and it can't be sent with System.Net.Mail (because of the SSL issue), one option is to use aspNetEmail (something I wrote -- so this is partially a shameless plug). I'm not aware of any open source email component that can do this, with the SSL connection required.

Here is some code (just tested, and it works).

EmailMessage m = new EmailMessage();
m.LogPath = "c:\\email.log";
m.Logging = true;

m.Server = "smtpout.secureserver.net";                    
m.Port = 465;                    
m.TimeOut = 10000;                    
m.Username = "testingaccount@comicidolonline.com";
m.Password = "abc123";            

m.From ="testingaccount@comicidolonline.com";
m.To = "youremail@youremail.com";
m.Subject = "subject here";
m.Body = "my body";                    

AdvancedIntellect.Ssl.SslSocket ssl = new AdvancedIntellect.Ssl.SslSocket();
//load the SSL socket, but tell it to connect *before* the 220 Welcome response
m.LoadSslSocket( ssl, true );

m.Send();                    
Console.WriteLine("Sent email");  

If you want to try aspNetEmail, feel free to download the latest build update from link text

You will also need a free eval license, which you can get from: link text

If you have any other questions, feel free to ping me offline.

(more info added during later edit) I couldn't find the orignal doc on MSDN that I was thinking of (it's been a few years). But here is a MSDN blog post from Dan Bagley. http://blogs.msdn.com/webdav_101/archive/2008/06/02/system-net-mail-with-ssl-to-authenticate-against-port-465.aspx

System.Net.Mail with SSL to authenticate against port 465 Sending mail using System.Net.Mail with SSL will fail:

System.Net.NetworkCredential aCred = new System.Net.NetworkCredential("myacct", "mypassword");

SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient("smtp.mail.myserver.com", 465);
smtp.EnableSsl = true;
smtp.UseDefaultCredentials = false;
smtp.Credentials = aCred;

System.Net.Mail only supports “Explicit SSL”.

Explicit SSL

System.Net.Mail only supports “Explicit SSL”. Explicit SSL starts as unencrypted on port 25, then issues a STARTDLS and switches to an Encrypted connection. See RFC 2228.

Explicit SLL would go something like: Connect on 25 -> StartTLS (starts to encrypt) -> authenticate -> send data

If the SMTP server expects SSL/TLS connection right from the start then this will not work.

Implicit SSL

There is no way to use Implicit SSL (SMTPS) with System.Net.Mail. Implicit SSL would have the entire connection is wrapped in an SSL layer. A specific port would be used (port 465 is common). There is no formal RFC covering Implicit SSL.

Implicit SLL would go something like: Start SSL (start encryption) -> Connect -> Authenticate -> send data

This is not considered a bug, it’s a feature request. There are two types of SSL authentication for SMTP, and we only support one (by design) – Explicit SSL.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Dave, thanks for putting in time for the response, but I was hoping there was a .NET workaround or way around this issue without me buying anything. Thanks again for your time. –  Vince Panuccio Aug 26 '09 at 23:12
    
Nope, can't do this with System.Net.Mail. This is a known issue, and is documented on MSDN. IIRC, this was actually submitted as a bug when .NET 2.0 was released in beta. However, since System.Net.Mail is tecnically RFC compliant in this scenario, it wasn't really considered a bug, and MS has no intention of providing a work-around. –  dave wanta Aug 27 '09 at 2:13
    
I don't recall reading anything about this in the past. Dave, can you post a link to the MSDN documentation for this or something like that? Just because this scenario isn't 100% defined in the RFC doesn't mean that MS won't support it if there's enough customer demand. Also, even in the updated RFC's (5321 and 4409) it's not mentioned anywhere I could find. Please provide some background so that I can bring this up with our PM as something to address for a future .Net release. Thanks –  Jeff Tucker Aug 30 '09 at 7:20
    
I couldn't find the original doc I was thinking of...but some quick googling turned up: blogs.msdn.com/webdav_101/archive/2008/06/02/… from the link--- System.Net.Mail only supports “Explicit SSL”. ... "This is not considered a bug, it’s a feature request. There are two types of SSL authentication for SMTP, and we only support one (by design) – Explicit SSL. " –  dave wanta Aug 31 '09 at 13:30
    
just added an edit to the above post, with more complete information. –  dave wanta Aug 31 '09 at 13:36

I found this post about GoDaddy's SMTP settings

THe code below worked for me. I had to change the port to the default SMTP port, and remove the domain specification from the NetworkCredentials.

 SmtpClient ss = new SmtpClient();

        try
        {
            ss.Host = "smtpout.secureserver.net";
            ss.Port = 25;
            ss.Timeout = 10000;
            ss.DeliveryMethod = SmtpDeliveryMethod.Network;
            ss.UseDefaultCredentials = false;
            ss.Credentials = new NetworkCredential("testingaccount@comicidolonline.com", "abc123");

            MailMessage mailMsg = new MailMessage("testingaccount@comicidolonline.com", "youremail@gmail.com", "subject here", "my body");
            mailMsg.DeliveryNotificationOptions = DeliveryNotificationOptions.OnFailure;
            ss.Send(mailMsg);

            Console.WriteLine("Sent email");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
share|improve this answer
    
you did not use ssl flag. That seems to OP's issue. –  krishna Aug 28 '09 at 19:09
    
I didn't see anywhere in the post where "I need SSL socket" was specified, so I figured just getting it to work was enough. –  scottm Aug 28 '09 at 19:41
    
See my answer for how the EnableSsl flag is used internally in SmtpClient but you are correct, that's the issue. –  Jeff Tucker Aug 30 '09 at 7:09

I was able to send an email through GoDaddy using these settings in the web.config:

<configuration>
    <system.net>
        <mailSettings>
            <smtp>
                <network host="smtpout.secureserver.net" userName="emailaccount@yourdomain.com" password="****" />
            </smtp>
        </mailSettings>
    </system.net>
</configuration>

and this code:

var SmtpClient = new SmtpClient();
SmtpClient.Send("emailaccount@yourdomain.com", "to@whatever.com", "subject", "body");

Note I believe that the from address in the email you are sending has to be from your domain. I tried sending an email as coming form another domain and got an error message.

You have to make sure you have an email account in GoDaddy, you can check by logging in and going to Products > Email > Email Plans. You also have to make sure SMTP relay is turned on, it was turned on by default for me. Also important to know by default my GoDaddy account only allows me to send 250 emails a day.

I posted the same answer to a similar question Sending email through gmail SMTP on GoDaddy

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1  
This worked for me. Thanks! –  Gordon Glas Sep 7 '12 at 21:24
    
@Alphatrak don't forget to vote up the answer if it worked for you! :) –  luisperezphd Sep 7 '12 at 22:16
    
Yep.. already did :) –  Gordon Glas Sep 8 '12 at 11:42

When you say it worked with Thunderbird, I'm assuming you tried from Thunderbird on the webserver? (You RDP'd in?)

Also, if this is a web app (assuming it is, since you are referring to godaddy), why do you have Console statements in a web app?!? There isn't any console involved.

Also, you say the code isn't working. How do you know? What is the exception?

share|improve this answer
    
Well I took the code and put it into a console app so I dont have to run the web application each time. I'm trying to send email using c# on my own machine. The settings I've mentioned above work in thunderbird which proves that the host, password and email work. The bit of code I've posted does not work. I get a timeout exception. Feel free to try, the username and password I've supplied are real :-) –  Vince Panuccio Aug 24 '09 at 5:32
5  
ahh...I think I see the problem (just did a quick telnet). Here is what I think is happening. Your mail server wants the SSL session initiated before the SMTP session ever starts. This is how Thunderbird connects with SMTP over SSL. However, some mail servers (per the RFCs), switch the SMTP session to SSL after the 220 welcome response is sent back. This is how System.Net.Mail works. It wants to see the first 220, and then switch to SSL. Since the 220 response is never sent (because the SSL session wasn't started-- a catch 22), System.Net.Mail timesout. –  dave wanta Aug 24 '09 at 12:11
    
Thank you Dave. At least you've shed some light on the subject. So I guess its not possible to fix. –  Vince Panuccio Aug 24 '09 at 13:34
    
@Dave, please consider adding that very useful comment to the answer itself? –  Arjan Aug 28 '09 at 19:22

Remove the EnableSsl = true and see if that fixes it. The way SmtpClient works is that if credentials are provided and the server advertises the AUTH keyword in the EHLO response headers, and when we try to do something it asks for auth, we attempt to auth with the provided credentials. However, with EnableSsl, if the server does NOT advertise STARTTLS as a response to the EHLO then we throw immediately since we will not be able to use it. Therefore, unless you are 100% CERTAIN that the smtp server you are using supports SSL (TLS actually) you should not set EnableSsl and leave it at its default value of false. If you post up the exception you're getting I can tell you why it's being thrown.

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