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I have the need to extend instances of various types at runtime. Most of the time, I need to work with instances of the original type, however in a few circumstances, I need to create kind of an extension-wrapper around those types that add a couple pieces of contextual information. Something along the lines of the following (which is not actually valid .NET/C# code...but it illustrates the point):

public abstract class BaseClass
{
  // ...
}

public class Concrete1: BaseClass
{
  // ...
}

public class Concrete2: BaseClass
{
  // ...
}

public class WrapperExtender<T>: T // Extending from T here is actually invalid!
  where T: BaseClass
{
    public WrapperExtender(T extensionTarget)
    {
        m_extensionTarget = extensionTarget;
    }

    private readonly T m_extensionTarget;

    public object ContextualReference { get; }
    public int ContextualValue { get; }

    // DERP: Would need to implement overrides of T here...buuut...can't...
}

// In use, special case:
var instance = new Concrete1();
var extendedInstance = new WrapperExtender(instance);

var processor = new SomeProcessorRequiringExtendedInstance();
processor.DoProcessing(extendedInstance);

Another example of this would probably be Microsoft Entity Framework v4.0, or nHibernate. Both of these frameworks provide dynamically extended instances of your entity types, wrapping them internally to provide, at runtime, the hooks required to keep a data/object/session context up to date with changes made to your entity instances. My needs are not nearly as complex, and the generics scenario above would work beautifully, if only there was a way to blend generics and dynamic typing somehow.

Anyway, I'm hoping someone knows how to achieve the above scenario. Or, perhaps even better, someone knows a better solution. I don't care much for the idea of dynamically extending a type like that at runtime (it doesn't make as much sense as it does in the EF/nHibernate scenario.) At the moment, its the only thing I can really think of that will provide me with the information I need in the processor for each type passed in to DoProcessing.

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2  
I'm interested, can you give more details on exactly what you're doing? –  Noon Silk Aug 23 '09 at 7:04
    
Take a look at my answer below. I figured out a solution that works perfectly, maintains separation of concerns, and doesn't muddy up dependencies. –  jrista Aug 23 '09 at 7:15

4 Answers 4

The problems that EF etc are solving is different, and relates to tihngs like lazy loading, etc. I'm simply not sure that the level of complexity that dynamic subclassing requires is worth it for this scenario. A few thoughts, though:

  • have a property bag in your object for flexible additional properties; if necessary the property-bag can be exposed to data-binding APIs via ICustomTypeDescriptor
  • simply wrap your object in an implementation-specific tuple that contains the existing object and the additional properties (no subclassing)

It is a shame that C# doesn't support "mixins", which would also be a nice way of implementing this type of thing with interfaces.

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I would love to have "mixins" as well. I wonder whether such a thing would be possible with C# 4.0's dynamic type capabilities... –  jrista Aug 23 '09 at 7:11
1  
You can have a poor mans mixin by implementing extension methods on an interface... –  Sam Saffron Aug 24 '09 at 2:47

I know that this can be accomplished using dynamicproxy (which is what NHibernate uses to accomplish this task) which you can find out more about here:

DynamicProxy Page

DynamicProxy tutorial

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I've used DynamicProxy before. Pretty powerful little library. Kind of overkill for my current needs... :\ –  jrista Aug 23 '09 at 6:55

If all you need is some additional properties, why not just create a context property in BaseClass?

something like this, where ContextBag is either a generic collection class or specially defined context collection:

Public ContextBag Context
{
   get;
   set;
}

When setting/accessing the context, you will be using syntax like this:

SubClass.Context.GetInt(ContextDefinition, ContextName);

SubClass.Context.Add(ContextDefinition, ContextName, ContextValue);
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The data is contextual...it doesn't belong in the base class, and shouldn't be available any time the executing code isn't "within context" such that it is available. Hence the need to temporarily extend the types with the additional data only when calls are made where that additional data is necessary and available. –  jrista Aug 23 '09 at 6:54
    
That should not stop the base class from creating a context bag to hold contextual information. Maybe I wasn't explicit enough that the Context class should be a collection, I have modified the sample code to reflect that. –  Bill Yang Aug 24 '09 at 2:37
    
Its an interesting idea. In a different environment, it might be the only option. However, I still dislike the fact that it puts short-term "contextual" data, or a bag for such data, in all instances of these types. If it was information that was always available (i.e. non-contextual), then I would definitely add it to the base. –  jrista Aug 24 '09 at 4:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found a better solution than temporarily extending. I created an actual context object that contained the state I needed available. Whenever that context exists, I initialize the context and set a static property that can be used to retrieve the context object from anywhere, alleviating the need to update all the dependencies of my larger process to take the context in as a parameter (which isn't always possible, as sometimes the calls are made in other contexts.)

public class SomeContext
{
    public SomeContext(object stateData1, object stateData2)
    {
        StateData1 = stateData1;
        StateData2 = stateData2;
    }

    public virtual object StateData1 { get; private set; }
    public virtual object StateData2 { get; private set; }

    [ThreadStatic]
    private static SomeContext m_threadInstance;    

    public static SomeContext Current
    {
        get
        {
            return m_threadInstance;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value != null && m_threadInstance != null) 
                throw new InvalidOperationException("This context has already been initialized for the current thread.");
            m_threadInstance = value;
        }
    }
}

public class SomeContextScope: IDisposable
{
    public SomeContextScope(object stateData1, object stateData2)
    {
        if (SomeContext.Current == null)
        {
            SomeContext context = new SomeContext(stateData1, stateData2);
            SomeContext.Current = context;
            m_contextCreated = true;
        }
    }

    private bool m_contextCreated;

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (m_contextCreated)
        {
            SomeContext.Current = null;
        }
    }
}

public class ComplexProcessor
{
    public ComplexProcessor(...) // Lots of dependencies injected

    public void DoProcessing(BaseClass instance)
    {
        // do some work with instance

        if (SomeContext.Current != null)
        {
            // do contextually sensitive stuff for SomeContext with instance
            // call a dependency that does contextually sensitive stuff
        }

        // do some more work with instance
        // call a dependency that does contextually sensitive stuff

        if (SomeOtherContext.Current != null)
        {
            // do contextually sensitive stuff for SomeOtherContext with instance
            // call a dependency that does contextually sensitive stuff
        }

        // call a dependency that does contextually sensitive stuff
    }
}

// The original setup of the context and initiation of processing

public void SomeOperation(...)
{
    using (SomeContextScope scope = new SomeContextScope(stateData1, stateData2))
    {    
        // ... do some work

        var processor = complexProcessorFactory.CreateInstance();
        processor.DoProcesing(data);

        // ... do more work
    }
}

I like the way this works. Context is the state within which behavior executes. It has always felt clunky to me to have to pass contextual data around with other objects, and have dozens of methods or method overloads that take in and pass along various forms of contextual data. By setting up a context object that is globally available for the duration of that context, my code is a lot cleaner, and my dependencies are more concise. It should be mockable too, since the Current property is read/write, I can create a mock context in a BDD specification or TDD unit test whenever one is required without a lot of hassle.

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1  
Be aware that a static context will be a nightmare for threaded code (such as ASP.NET, WCF, etc - or anything else with multiple threads). At least, consider [ThreadStatic] - but IMO, not the best way of tackling this problem. –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '09 at 8:02
    
(just as an example, since you mention TDD - some test-runners will use multiple threads...) –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '09 at 8:03
    
It actually is ThreadStatic in my implementation, and it will never be used in an ASP.NET or WCF environment. It is a windows WPF application that is completely installed in the users desktop, and has no need to connect to any services or websites. There are threads, but I have very tight control over them. –  jrista Aug 23 '09 at 21:38
    
I've updated my example to reflect my actual implementation. Still a bit contrived, but it demonstrates the idea. –  jrista Aug 23 '09 at 21:57

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