Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class heirarchy of:

class BaseProcess
{
    public virtual void Execute() = 0;  

};

class SubProcess : BaseProcess
{
    public virtual void Execute()
    {
        //Do Something

        //Need to call back to the GUI here, maybe to get a file path from a file selector

        //Do Something Else

        //Now want to update the GUI with the progress of the operation perhaps

        //More processing   
    }
};

Assuming that a SubProcess object is created and called from a GUI button event handler...

My question is what is the best way to interact with the GUI from within the Execute() function? (Also assuming that that Execute() may be running on a different thread)

The idea I had was to pass a Callback into the SubProcess object, as this would allow me to send info to the GUI, however in the case of a File Selector, what would be the best way to get the data back to the SubProcess object? I would like the solution to be as generic as possible so I could return different types of data, depending on the request.

Note: Please ignore any code mistakes, I knocked the sample together quickly just to illustrate the problem

Update:

Sorry to be clear, this would be on Windows, MFC. I'm not sure how much this matters as I think the overall design should be applicable to most GUI frameworks?

share|improve this question
1  
which gui framework? –  UmNyobe Nov 1 '12 at 13:47
1  
Threads. Get a thread to do the real work and tell it to post the result back to the GUI when its done. –  andre Nov 1 '12 at 13:48
    
If this is Windows, you would use SendMessage(). –  Johnny Mopp Nov 1 '12 at 13:50
    
That's fine but what if I want to post progress during the execution? Also what if I need input from the GUI not just output to the GUI? –  TomP89 Nov 1 '12 at 13:51
    
Sorry, yes Windows, MFC –  TomP89 Nov 1 '12 at 13:51
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class SubProcess : BaseProcess
{
    public virtual void Execute()
    {
        //Do Something

        char file_name[MAX_PATH +1];
        myWindow->SendMessage(WM_GETFILE, max_path, (LPARAM)file_name); 

        //Do Something Else

        myWindow->SendMessage(WM_UPDATE, 50);

        //More processing   
    }
};

And in the window class:

#define WM_GETFILE (WM_USER+1)
#define WM_UPDATE (WM_USER+2)

BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(CMyWindow, CWnd)
    ON_MESSAGE(WM_GETFILE, MyGetFileHandler)
    ON_MESSAGE(WM_UPDATE, MyUpdateHandler)
END_MESSAGE_MAP()

LRESULT CMyWindow::MyGetFileHandler(WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
}
LRESULT CMyWindow::MyUpdateHandler(WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty much exactly the sort of solution I was looking for, thanks –  TomP89 Nov 1 '12 at 14:00
    
You should also use an Event so the GUI thread can alert the worker thread when it has processed the WM_GETFILE message. The message handler would contain a SetEvent(), and the worker thread would WaitForSingleObject() until the event is set. –  japreiss Nov 1 '12 at 14:00
    
@japreiss SendMessage() will block so an event isn't needed. –  Johnny Mopp Nov 1 '12 at 14:04
    
I stand corrected. –  japreiss Nov 1 '12 at 14:57
add comment

The MFC technique I used some time ago was based on standard Idle Loop processing.

This is the easy way, because running in the main thread, your worker can acts directly on GUI objects.

If you call the message loop from your worker process 'sufficiently often', the GUI will keep running smoothly.

If you can afford some complexity in your development cycle you could use threads instead, but in my experience, its' more difficult.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Depends on the GUI. If you're on a system where the GUI allows you to control it from different threads, then you could make direct GUI calls from within Execute(). If the GUI doesn't allow this, then you can communicate with the main thread through messages, make the GUI calls there, and message the results back to the Execute() thread.

A GUI framework that makes this rather straight-forward to implement is Qt, using its signals and slots mechanism.

share|improve this answer
add comment
class GuiCallback
{
 public:
     string getFilePath () {/*show the dialog and return the path*/}
     void update (/*arguments with data*/) {}
};
class BaseProcess
{
    public virtual void Execute(GuiCallback*) = 0;  

};

class SubProcess : BaseProcess
{
    public virtual void Execute(GuiCallback* callback)
    {
        //Do Something

        string path = callback->getFilePath ();

        //Do Something Else

        callback->update (...);

        //More processing   
    }
};

Implementation of getFilePath and update will depend on what platform/gui framework you use

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer, unfortunately I would like to to be more generic than this so I could request different types of data not just strings. –  TomP89 Nov 1 '12 at 13:56
    
@TomP89, you can declare however many functions you like with whatever return types you want in GuiCallback –  user1773602 Nov 1 '12 at 13:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.