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I have this code, and a bit of a beginner's problem:

function findfruit (food){

var fruitvalues = ["apple", "orange", "banana", "mango", "kiwi", "watermelon"];
if (fruitsvalues.indexOf(food) != -1){
    return true;
    }
else {
    return false;
    }
    }


var food = prompt("Write down any food you like");
findfruit(food) // returns always the correct answer, true or false

So here is the thing: This works well without problems, but if I do:

String.prototype.fruit = findfruit;

and then I try to make

if (food.fruit != true) {
    alert("your food is not a fruit");
    }
else {
    alert("your food is a fruit");

it doesn't work, and it always results "false". I suspect that my problem is that when I invoke food.fruit, the function findfruitstarts without using the string variable foodthat I just created, but I don't understand why. I am just reading tutorials as for how to use prototype, and I cannot find anything wrong (although I am sure there is something).

I would appreciate any help. I know this must be pretty easy, but the other questions about prototype that I found here couldn't help.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you simply use this to reference the string, you'll actually be scoped to the function. this.valueOf will look to the parent object (String).

String.prototype.fruit = function () {
var fruitvalues = ["apple", "orange", "banana", "mango", "kiwi", "watermelon"];
if (fruitvalues.indexOf(this.valueOf()) != -1){
    return true;
}
else {
    return false;
}
}

var food = 'apple';

if (food.fruit() != true) {
    console.log("your food is not a fruit");
}
else {
    console.log("your food is a fruit");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Your code does exactly what I wanted. – telex-wap Nov 1 '12 at 14:25

1) Writing food.fruit is not a function invocation. It will just return the function itself (which obviously can't be equal to true).

2) You can access the object from which the function is invoked as this. It won't be passed as an argument to your function (this isn't Python). The correct implementation is

String.prototype.fruit = function() {
   var fruitvalues = ["apple", "orange", "banana"];
   return (fruitvalues.indexOf(this.toString()) != -1);
}

3) Adding functions like this to prototypes of built-in types is discouraged. It's tempting, but you have to ask yourself: "Is this generic enough that I will need it everywhere in my program ?".

share|improve this answer
    
This would need "use strict"; or .indexOf(this + "") to get a primitive value. – pimvdb Nov 1 '12 at 14:02
    
indexOf(this) will not work, you will always get false. You need to do indexOf(this.toString()) or valueOf – epascarello Nov 1 '12 at 14:04
    
Oh, I have read quite a lot about how discouraged is to use prototypes, but before I decide "not" to use it, I would like to learn the proper way to use it. Thanks for your answer! – telex-wap Nov 1 '12 at 14:26
    
@pimvdb: Thanks, I forgot about that. Fixed now. – lqc Nov 1 '12 at 14:35

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