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What is the simplest way to bind a group of 3 radiobuttons to a property of type int for values 1, 2, or 3?

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Have a look at this blog entry: > WPF RadioButtons and data binding –  Nifle Aug 23 '09 at 7:40
    
Please look at the solution Binding IsChecked property of RadioButton in WPF, it works like a charm. The original problem has been fixed for WPF 4.0! –  Alexander Zwitbaum Nov 6 '09 at 15:43
    
A better and more generic solution can be found in this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/406798/414306 –  Steve Streeting Dec 28 '12 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Actually, using the converter like that breaks two-way binding, plus as I said above, you can't use that with enumerations either. The better way to do this is with a simple style against a ListBox, like this:

Note: Contrary to what DrWPF.com stated in their example, do not put the ContentPresenter inside the RadioButton or else if you add an item with content such as a button or something else, you will not be able to set focus or interact with it. This technique solves that. Also, you need to handle the graying of the text as well as removing of margins on labels or else it will not render correctly. This style handles both for you as well.

<Style x:Key="RadioButtonListItem" TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}" >

    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>

            <ControlTemplate TargetType="ListBoxItem">

                <DockPanel LastChildFill="True" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Center" >

                    <RadioButton IsChecked="{TemplateBinding IsSelected}" Focusable="False" IsHitTestVisible="False" VerticalAlignment="Center" Margin="0,0,4,0" />

                    <ContentPresenter
                        Content             = "{TemplateBinding ContentControl.Content}"
                        ContentTemplate     = "{TemplateBinding ContentControl.ContentTemplate}"
                        ContentStringFormat = "{TemplateBinding ContentControl.ContentStringFormat}"
                        HorizontalAlignment = "{TemplateBinding Control.HorizontalContentAlignment}"
                        VerticalAlignment   = "{TemplateBinding Control.VerticalContentAlignment}"
                        SnapsToDevicePixels = "{TemplateBinding UIElement.SnapsToDevicePixels}" />

                </DockPanel>

            </ControlTemplate>

        </Setter.Value>

    </Setter>

</Style>

<Style x:Key="RadioButtonList" TargetType="ListBox">

    <Style.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="Label">
            <Setter Property="Padding" Value="0" />
        </Style>
    </Style.Resources>

    <Setter Property="BorderThickness" Value="0" />
    <Setter Property="Background"      Value="Transparent" />

    <Setter Property="ItemContainerStyle" Value="{StaticResource RadioButtonListItem}" />

    <Setter Property="Control.Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type ListBox}">
                <ItemsPresenter SnapsToDevicePixels="{TemplateBinding UIElement.SnapsToDevicePixels}" />
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>

    <Style.Triggers>
        <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="False">
            <Setter Property="TextBlock.Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.GrayTextBrushKey}}" />
        </Trigger>
    </Style.Triggers>

</Style>

<Style x:Key="HorizontalRadioButtonList" BasedOn="{StaticResource RadioButtonList}" TargetType="ListBox">
    <Setter Property="ItemsPanel">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ItemsPanelTemplate>
                <VirtualizingStackPanel Background="Transparent" Orientation="Horizontal" />
            </ItemsPanelTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

You now have the look and feel of radio buttons, but you can do two-way binding, and you can use an enumeration. Here's how...

<ListBox Style="{StaticResource RadioButtonList}"
    SelectedValue="{Binding SomeVal}"
    SelectedValuePath="Tag">

    <ListBoxItem Tag="{x:Static l:MyEnum.SomeOption}"     >Some option</ListBoxItem>
    <ListBoxItem Tag="{x:Static l:MyEnum.SomeOtherOption}">Some other option</ListBoxItem>
    <ListBoxItem Tag="{x:Static l:MyEnum.YetAnother}"     >Yet another option</ListBoxItem>

</ListBox>

Also, since we explicitly separated out the style that tragets the ListBoxItem rather than putting it inline, again as the other examples have shown, you can now create a new style off of it to customize things on a per-item basis such as spacing. (This will not work if you simply try to target ListBoxItem as the keyed style overrides generic control targets.)

Here's an example of putting a margin of 6 above and below each item. (Note how you have to explicitly apply the style via the ItemContainerStyle property and not simply targeting ListBoxItem in the ListBox's resource section for the reason stated above.)

<Window.Resources>
    <Style x:Key="SpacedRadioButtonListItem" TargetType="ListBoxItem" BasedOn="{StaticResource RadioButtonListItem}">
        <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0,6" />
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>

<ListBox Style="{StaticResource RadioButtonList}"
    ItemContainerStyle="{StaticResource SpacedRadioButtonListItem}"
    SelectedValue="{Binding SomeVal}"
    SelectedValuePath="Tag">

    <ListBoxItem Tag="{x:Static l:MyEnum.SomeOption}"     >Some option</ListBoxItem>
    <ListBoxItem Tag="{x:Static l:MyEnum.SomeOtherOption}">Some other option</ListBoxItem>
    <ListBoxItem Tag="{x:Static l:MyEnum.YetAnother}"     >Ter another option</ListBoxItem>

</ListBox>

Hope this helps, and of course, if you like this, please mark as accepted or vote me up!! :)

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11  
+1, but if that's the simplest way to bind a group of 3 radiobuttons to a property of type int for values 1, 2, or 3, it does not speak very well for WPF really. It's really beyond me why they make the simpliest of things so headscratchingly difficult and needlessly complex –  Konrad Morawski Apr 30 '12 at 13:36
    
This actually does a little more than just that as it styles a listbox, which is a single control, and that's why binding works so simply (once you get through the crazy set-up of it.) But yes, I agree the RadioButton class definitely has some binding shortcomings. Of course you could do it much simpler with code-behind, but this way here, you only have to do the styles and such once, then using it later is much easier. –  MarqueIV Apr 30 '12 at 15:43

I came up with a simple solution.

I have a model.cs class with:

private int _isSuccess;
public int IsSuccess { get { return _isSuccess; } set { _isSuccess = value; } }

I have Window1.xaml.cs file with DataContext set to model.cs. The xaml contains the radiobuttons:

<RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=IsSuccess, Converter={StaticResource radioBoolToIntConverter}, ConverterParameter=1}" Content="one" />
<RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=IsSuccess, Converter={StaticResource radioBoolToIntConverter}, ConverterParameter=2}" Content="two" />
<RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=IsSuccess, Converter={StaticResource radioBoolToIntConverter}, ConverterParameter=3}" Content="three" />

Here is my converter:

public class RadioBoolToIntConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        int integer = (int)value;
        if (integer==int.Parse(parameter.ToString()))
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return parameter;
    }
}

And of course, in Window1's resources:

<Window.Resources>
    <local:RadioBoolToIntConverter x:Key="radioBoolToIntConverter" />
</Window.Resources>
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2  
@MarqueIV That problem is easily solved as can be seen in the first comment for the accepted answer of this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/397556/… –  user1151923 Jan 2 '13 at 15:11
1  
One thing @user1151923... isn't the proper thing to return in that case 'Binding.DoNothing' and not 'DependencyProperty.UnsetValue'? –  MarqueIV Jan 2 '13 at 17:05
3  
Much cleaner than accepted answer - exactly what I was looking for. –  Rob Hardy Jul 22 '13 at 14:59
1  
How to set the default value. That is to select the first radio button when the window is first displayed? –  Killercam Jul 31 '13 at 20:22
2  
But, pretty please, no "if (true) return true; else return false;" constructs... :-) –  Gábor May 2 at 18:10

I know it's way way overdue, but I have an alternative solution, which is lighter and simpler. Derive a class from System.Windows.Controls.RadioButton and declare two dependency properties RadioValue and RadioBinding. Then in the class code, override OnChecked and set the RadioBinding property value to that of the RadioValue property value. In the other direction, trap changes to the RadioBinding property using a callback, and if the new value is equal to the value of the RadioValue property, set its IsChecked property to true.

Here's the code:

public class MyRadioButton : RadioButton
{
    public object RadioValue
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(RadioValueProperty); }
        set { SetValue(RadioValueProperty, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for RadioValue.
       This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty RadioValueProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register(
            "RadioValue", 
            typeof(object), 
            typeof(MyRadioButton), 
            new UIPropertyMetadata(null));

    public object RadioBinding
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(RadioBindingProperty); }
        set { SetValue(RadioBindingProperty, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for RadioBinding.
       This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty RadioBindingProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register(
            "RadioBinding", 
            typeof(object), 
            typeof(MyRadioButton), 
            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
                null, 
                FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.BindsTwoWayByDefault, 
                OnRadioBindingChanged));

    private static void OnRadioBindingChanged(
        DependencyObject d,
        DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        MyRadioButton rb = (MyRadioButton)d;
        if (rb.RadioValue.Equals(e.NewValue))
            rb.SetCurrentValue(RadioButton.IsCheckedProperty, true);
    }

    protected override void OnChecked(RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnChecked(e);
        SetCurrentValue(RadioBindingProperty, RadioValue);
    }
}

XAML usage:

<my:MyRadioButton GroupName="grp1" Content="Value 1"
    RadioValue="val1" RadioBinding="{Binding SelectedValue}"/>
<my:MyRadioButton GroupName="grp1" Content="Value 2"
    RadioValue="val2" RadioBinding="{Binding SelectedValue}"/>
<my:MyRadioButton GroupName="grp1" Content="Value 3"
    RadioValue="val3" RadioBinding="{Binding SelectedValue}"/>
<my:MyRadioButton GroupName="grp1" Content="Value 4"
    RadioValue="val4" RadioBinding="{Binding SelectedValue}"/>

Hope someone finds this useful after all this time :)

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I am very suprised nobody came up with this kind of solution to bind it against bool array. It might not be the cleanest, but it can be used very easily:

private bool[] _modeArray = new bool[] { true, false, false};
public bool[] ModeArray
{
    get { return _modeArray ; }
}
public int SelectedMode
{
    get
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < _modeArray .Length; i++)
           if (_modeArray[i]) return i;
       return -1;
    }
}

in XAML:

<RadioButton GroupName="Mode" IsChecked="{Binding Path=SelectedMode[0], Mode=TwoWay}"/>
<RadioButton GroupName="Mode" IsChecked="{Binding Path=SelectedMode[1], Mode=TwoWay}"/>
<RadioButton GroupName="Mode" IsChecked="{Binding Path=SelectedMode[2], Mode=TwoWay}"/>

NOTE: you dont need two-way binding if you dont want to one checked by default. TwoWay binding is the biggest cons of this solution.

Pros:

  • No need for code behind
  • No need for extra class (IValue Converter)
  • No Need for extra enums
  • doesnt require bizzare binding
  • straightforward and easy to understand
  • doesnt violate MVVM (heh, at least I hope so)
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