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Say I have some statements like:

List<string> list = new List<string> {"1", "1", "2", "3", "4"};
try
{
    Class1 c = new Class1
        {
            s1 = list.Single(s => s == "1"),
            s2 = list.Single(s => s == "2"),
            s3 = list.Single(s => s == "3"),
            s4 = list.Single(s => s == "4")
        };
}
catch (InvalidOperationException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
}

And I definitely will go to the catch block with an error "The input sequence contains more than one element" at this line:

s1 = list.Single(s => s == "1")

So, I just curious, it there any way to display error predicate in catch block? This will be very useful to fix the bugs, if we'll see something like "There was a duplicate element "1" in sequence." or even full predicate in string format. Can I somehow view this information and display or log it?

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Well, the exception does already contain the line it occurred on doesn't it? –  Justin Harvey Nov 1 '12 at 14:32
    
Are you able to attach a debugger or it's for "production" log purpose? –  Allov Nov 1 '12 at 14:34
    
@Brian Rasmussen, yep, you're quite right I just tried it. I guess that is a problem with use of initialisation lists that can throw. If you moved the initialisations to the constructor of Class1, you would get the line number. –  Justin Harvey Nov 1 '12 at 14:35
    
I suppose no, because 1) in production we don't have symbols; 2) you'll see line number that points to Class1 c = new Class1, not to s1 = list.Single(s => s == "1"). And we can have many such lines of code. –  John Preston Nov 1 '12 at 14:37
    
Put everything in seperate try-catch statements. –  Tim Schmelter Nov 1 '12 at 14:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you really need info about predicate and it's parameters, then you can create your own Single extension method (it will be called instead of default method), which will actually wrap default Single call, but it will receive Expression (expression tree that represents the lambda expression) instead of Func (lambda expression):

public static T Single<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, 
                          Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate)
{
    try
    {
        return sequence.Single(predicate.Compile());
    }
    catch (InvalidOperationException ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Error on predicate " + predicate);
        throw;
    }            
}

On line s1 = list.Single(s => s == "1") it will throw an exception and write pretty error message:

Error on predicate s => s == "1"

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While this would work, I'm not sure I like "hiding" the default operation like this. That combined with the fact that you'd have to hide all overloads and all other Linq extensions it seems too narrow a scope to be considered a good solution. It is clever, though :) –  D Stanley Nov 1 '12 at 15:09
    
@DStanley thanks! I'd also better switched from in-line initialization, and received a good stack trace. But if it is not possible for some reason, and if parameters info really important, then expression tree is a good choice. Also maybe OP have problems only with 'Single' method. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 1 '12 at 15:21
List<string> list = new List<string> {"1", "1", "2", "3", "4"};
string sValue=null;
try
{
    sValue="1";
    Class1 c = new Class1
    {
       s1 = list.Single(s => s == sValue),

    };
}
catch (InvalidOperationException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("s => s == "+ sValue);
}
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That's not valid syntax for an object initializer. –  D Stanley Nov 1 '12 at 14:41
    
How do you expect this to work? –  John Preston Nov 1 '12 at 14:41
    
fixed syntax.sorry. @lazyberezovsky method is fine –  Frank59 Nov 1 '12 at 14:52

No, The exception thrown (InvalidOperationException) is generic and won't give that sort of detail. The stack trace will start at Single() and not show the predicate that was passed in.

If you need that level of detail you could either set the properties in separate statements so that you can get the line number from the stack trace, or you could do a "pre-check" of the data to make sure it meets your conditions for uniqueness.

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