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I have many classes that are stored in lists. I'm attempting to create a method that accepts a List as a generic type and returns the contents of every element within in the appropriate list as a string.

This is a sample of one of many classes. This would be defined as List<Player>:

public class Player
{
    public int PlayerId { get; set; }
    public string PlayerName { get; set; }
    public string FavoriteThing { get; set; }
}

I'm still struggling to get the syntax correct here:

  public static string GetStringOfData<T>(List<T> data)
    {
        string dataString = string.Empty;
        var type = data.GetType();

        // Insert magic here to get values for PlayerId, PlayerName, etc...

        return dataString;
    }

How can we make this happen? I'm using C# 4.0.

Updates The classes I'm using are generated from an edmx model, connecting to a database. This is for a reporting tool that will parse various tables and report errors to a user via email. The users have specifically requested the ability to see the contents of all fields.

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2  
That is the opposite of parsing - serializing. "Magic" can be any serializer - JSON, for example, or XML, or other tools. –  Kobi Nov 1 '12 at 14:37
    
The best solution depends on what kind of output you want, and what the possible types for T might be (is this a handful of your own classes, or could it be anything at all). –  Jon B Nov 1 '12 at 14:39
    
What will you use the output string for? Debugging? Will you save the string? Do you need to build the object again from the string? Should it be readable? –  Kobi Nov 1 '12 at 14:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to do the following:

        foreach(T item in data)
        {
            var props = item.GetType().GetProperties();
            foreach(var prop in props)
            {   
                dataString += prop.GetValue(item, null);
            }
        }
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Thank you, this does exactly what I needed. –  Rethic Nov 1 '12 at 14:52
1  
Depending on the size of the list of strings. You might also be better off with using StringBuilder instead of +=. –  marcellscarlett Nov 1 '12 at 14:56
    
Excellent point about the StringBuilder. –  Rethic Nov 1 '12 at 15:10

Every type inherits the ToString method from object. Override ToString in your classes.

public class Player
{
    ...

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("Player [ID = {0}, Name = {1}]",
                             PlayerId, PlayerName);
    }

{ 

Then you can use the non-generic IEnumerable to work on them. (Why limit yourself to List<T> if you can have a free lunch with IEnumerable? The latter will work with List<T>, arrays, SortedLists<T>, HashSet<T>, IEnumerbale<T>, algorithmic implementations of IEnumerable not based on a collection at all, ...)

public static string GetStringOfData(IEnumerable data)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();

    foreach (object o in data) {
        sb.Append(o).Append("; ");
    }    
    if (sb.Length >= 2 ) {
        sb.Length -= 2;
    }    
    return sb.ToString();
}

This works with almost any type of collection.


Note: Overriding ToString has the positive side effect that the debugger will show you this string instead of just showing the type name.

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And in my opinion this is the absolute 100% right approach! –  Michael Perrenoud Nov 1 '12 at 14:44
    
This is basically the solution I was going to suggest. Polymorphic Conditional for the win! –  Tejs Nov 1 '12 at 14:44
1  
Actually, this is a not so good approach. Sorry. What if my name is Kobi, ID = 3;? (and yes, I know you can escape the string, but I can keep going...) It really depends on what the OP is after, of course. ToString() can work if the OP is trying to build a list for quick debugging, for example. –  Kobi Nov 1 '12 at 14:47
    
I do like this approach. For simplicity's sake, I didn't mention that each object I have is generated via an EDMX model. I'll have to create a metadata class for each of these tables before I can apply this method. –  Rethic Nov 1 '12 at 14:55
    
@Kobi: Why do you want to escape a string? That's just a matter of representation. You could display strings within quotes, for instance. You have all the freedom you want within ToString; it depends what the OP wants. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 1 '12 at 15:13

Couple options here.

You could have all of your classes implement some interface, like

IDataString

which includes a method of getting string data from the object. Then your method could just accept a List of those, and return a string:

public static string GetStringOfData(List<IDataString> data)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach(var dm in data)
        {
          sb.append(dm.InterfaceMethod());
        }

        return sb.ToString()
    }

You could also override ToString in all of your objects, and just accept a List of objects. The code would be similar. This is assuming you don't mind losing the normal ToString functionality.

You could do this with refelction, which I think is what you're after in the question, but are you just going to concatenate all public string fields? This is a little slower and a lot more ugly but possible for sure.

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First in each of the classes override ToString() method:

public class Player
{
    public int PlayerId { get; set; }
    public string PlayerName { get; set; }
    public string FavoriteThing { get; set; }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.PlayerId.Tostring() + " " + PlayerName + " " + FavoriteThing;
    }
}

Then in your method concatenate all returned strings from class instances:

public static string GetStringOfData<T>(List<T> data)
        {
            StringBuilder dataBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (object o in data)
            {
                dataBuilder.Append(o.ToString());
                dataBuilder.Append(" ");
            }

            return dataBuilder.ToString();
        }

Note that it is better to concatenate strings using StringBuilder because of performance issues.

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The magic you are expecting might be Reflection: determining the prooperties at runtime and getting their values for each item in the list.

The code for this is the following:

public static string GetStringOfData<T>(List<T> list)
{
    var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

    var properties = typeof(T).GetProperties()
        .Where(p => !p.GetIndexParameters().Any());

    foreach (var item in list)
    {
        foreach (var propertyInfo in properties)
        {
            stringBuilder.AppendFormat("{0}={1};",
                                        propertyInfo.Name,
                                        propertyInfo.GetValue(item, null));
        }
        stringBuilder.AppendLine();
    }

    return stringBuilder.ToString();
}
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