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I would like the image to be positioned at the far right of the 200px span. Instead, it is positioned just at the end of the "hello" text, and since "hello" is shorter than 200px, it is not positioned at the far right of the 200px span.

<span>Hello</span>

span {
   background-image: url("image.gif");
   background-position:right center; 
   background-repeat: no-repeat;
   min-width: 200px;
   width: 200px;
}
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1  
Have you researched what type of element a span is by default? I guess not. It is an inline element. That means that setting a width has no influence and the width of the element is the width of the content. set display to block. –  Sven Bieder Nov 1 '12 at 14:53
1  
But if I set it to block, then adjacent elements will not appear inline –  user1032531 Nov 1 '12 at 14:55
    
surely not. you must somewhere make a decision what kind of element you want (with it's features). If you use html5 and css3 you could also set display to inline-block. then it has your effect. but it works not with older ie versions –  Sven Bieder Nov 1 '12 at 14:57
    
Ah, the joy of older browsers –  user1032531 Nov 1 '12 at 15:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't set a width on a span—an inline element.

Set it to display: inline-block and it will work.

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Perfect! Thanks –  user1032531 Nov 1 '12 at 14:58

From what I can see there doesn't seem to be a reason to keep the span at 200px. What about adding some padding to the right that is the same size as your image, plus a little more? For example, if your image.gif is 16px wide, then do:

padding-right:20px;

and get rid of width and min-width. This way you won't have to mess around with the display and browser compatibility issues.

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Good idea. I think this will work for me. I think this is the best answer, but bookcasey's is the right answer (if that makes any sense :)) –  user1032531 Nov 1 '12 at 15:11

I would try making the span display = block if your design permits it.

span  {
    display:block;
    background-image: url("image.gif");
    background-position:right center; 
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    min-width: 200px;
    width: 200px;}

I think that you may have to do this to get a SPAN to respect the width. Unfortunately, it will kick down the next set of elements to the next line.

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