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Is there a way I can make the following db query builder generic?

private IQueryable<Foo> ByName(IQueryable<Foo> dbQuery, Query query)
{
    string[] searchTerms = query.Data.Replace(" ","").ToLower().Split(',');

    if (query.Exclude)
    {
        return dbQuery.Where(x => searchTerms.All(
            y => y != x.Name.Replace(" ", "").ToLower()));
    }

    return dbQuery.Where(x => searchTerms.Any(
        y => y == x.Name.Replace(" ", "").ToLower()));
}

I've got the same function for lots of different properties of Foo. ByCounty, ByTown, ByStreet etc etc.

I've written some functions that return linq before like the following

public Expression<Func<Foo, bool>> FoosAreWithinDistanceFromGeocode(
    double distance, Geocode geocode)
{
    double distanceSquare = distance * distance;
    return foo => ( SqlFunctions.Square((double)(
        foo.Address.Geocode.Easting - geocode.Easting)) +
        SqlFunctions.Square((double)(fooAddress.Geocode.Northing - 
        geocode.Northing)) ) <= distanceSquare;
}

But I can't seem to find if the Linq-to-SQL stuff can't use generics or if it's possible to pass properties as generics and that kind of thing.


EDIT: I have this working generically for a single search term.

Where [query.Data == "Foo1"]

return dbQuery.Where(SearchMatch("Name", query.Data));

public Expression<Func<Foo, bool>> SearchMatch(string propertyName, string searchTerm)
{
    var foo = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Foo), "foo");
    var prop = Expression.Property(foo, propertyName);
    var search = Expression.Constant(searchTerm);
    var equal = Expression.Equal(prop, search);

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<Foo, bool>>(equal, foo);
}

Anyone have any ideas how to make it work for an array of strings?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using LINQ-to-SQL or LINQ-to-Objects/LINQ-to-XML? It turns out the LINQ-to-SQL is much more restrictive at runtime, throwing exceptions processing the same code that perfectly works with object or XML-based data sources. –  J0HN Nov 1 '12 at 15:33
    
Hah, I recognise FoosAreWithinDistanceFromGeocode :) –  Rawling Nov 1 '12 at 15:37
    
How can I tell if i'm using linq-to-sql or linq-to-objects? I'm using a code first model if that helps? The IQueryable creates a big sql statement before I execute it on .ToList() –  Neil Nov 1 '12 at 15:43
    
Going down the expression builder route is possible, but time-consuming and a bit hair-raising because you give up a lot of the safety the compiler gives you. Before you set off down that path, have you considered building the predicate inside the Query object? –  Iain Galloway Nov 1 '12 at 16:33
    
You're going the wrong way with this; you're throwing away compile-time checking for runtime checking. –  casperOne Nov 1 '12 at 17:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to define an interface that exposes the properties that you want to access, like so:

public interface IHaveName
{
    string Name { get; }
}

Then, on your classes, you would implement the interface:

public class Foo : IHaveName

If you're using the classes generated from a DBML file, these classes are marked with the partial keyword so implementing the interface is as simple as creating a new file, and inserting:

public partial class Foo : IHaveName

Since the property is already declared as public in the other .cs file generated from the .dbml file, the interface is implemented implicitly.

Finally, you would rewrite your ByName method to take a generic type parameter with a constraint that it implement your interface IHaveName:

private IQueryable<T> ByName<T>(IQueryable<T> dbQuery, Query query)
    where T : IHaveName
{
    // Everything else is the same.

For your other properties (and methods which use them), you could aggregate them together into one interface, or separate them out, depending on your needs.


Based on your edit, if you want to create an expression dynamically, you don't have to give up compile-time safety:

public Expression<Func<Foo, bool>> SearchMatch(
    Expression<Func<Foo, string>> property, string searchTerm)
{
    var foo = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Foo), "foo");
    // Get the property info from the property expression.
    var prop = Expression.Property(foo, 
        (property.Body as MemberExpression).Member as PropertyInfo);
    var search = Expression.Constant(searchTerm);
    var equal = Expression.Equal(prop, search);

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<Foo, bool>>(equal, foo);
}

Which you then call like so:

var expression = SearchMatch(f => f.Name, "searchTerm");

This ensures that the properties that you are passing to SearchMatch actually exist on Foo. Note if you wanted to make this generic for other scalar property types, you would do the following:

public Expression<Func<Foo, bool>> SearchMatch<T>(
    Expression<Func<Foo, T>> property, T searchTerm)
{
    var foo = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Foo), "foo");
    // Get the property info from the property expression.
    var prop = Expression.Property(foo, 
        (property.Body as MemberExpression).Member as PropertyInfo);
    var search = Expression.Constant(searchTerm);
    var equal = Expression.Equal(prop, search);

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<Foo, bool>>(equal, foo);
}
share|improve this answer

If I understood what you are trying to achieve reflection might help you. At least if you play nice. Here's a simplified but working example

internal class Program
{
    private class Data
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Address { get; set; }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return String.Format("My name is {0} and I'm living at {1}", Name, Address);
        }
    }

    static Expression<Func<Data,bool>> BuildExpression(PropertyInfo prop, IQueryable<string> restrict)
    {
        return (data) => !restrict.Any(elem => elem == prop.GetValue(data, null));
    }

    static IQueryable<Data> FilterData(IQueryable<Data> input, Expression<Func<Data, bool>> filter)
    {
        return input.Where(filter);
    }

    public static void Main (string[] args)
    {
        List<Data> list = new List<Data>()
                               {
                                   new Data {Name = "John", Address = "1st Street"},
                                   new Data {Name = "Mary",Address = "2nd Street"},
                                   new Data {Name = "Carl", Address = "3rd Street"}
                               };

        var filterByNameExpression = BuildExpression(typeof (Data).GetProperty("Name"),
                                                     (new List<string> {"John", "Carl"}).AsQueryable());

        var filterByAddressExpression = BuildExpression(typeof(Data).GetProperty("Address"),
                                                     (new List<string> { "2nd Street"}).AsQueryable());

        IQueryable<Data> filetedByName = FilterData(list.AsQueryable(), filterByNameExpression);
        IQueryable<Data> filetedByAddress = FilterData(list.AsQueryable(), filterByAddressExpression);

        Console.WriteLine("Filtered by name");
        foreach (var d in filetedByName)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(d);
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Filtered by address");
        foreach (var d in filetedByAddress)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(d);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

Hovewer, I'\m almost sure it won't work with LINQ-to-SQL. One way to workaround it is to materialize the IQueryable before passing it to such filtering methods (e.g. by calling ToList on them).

share|improve this answer
    
You can definitely build the expression at runtime, but you don't get any type checking. Why rely on a convention that can only be checked at runtime when you can rely on a compile time error (well, you'd only do this if you can't modify the entity classes)? –  casperOne Nov 1 '12 at 15:57
    
I'm trying to avoid calling ToList, I want to build the expression completely then sent it off. Looks like I should be able to do it with something like the following ParameterExpression parameter = Expression.Parameter( typeof(Foo), "Name" ); Then creating a lambda expression to use in the where using the parameter and some other logic –  Neil Nov 1 '12 at 16:00
    
I just tried this method but it comes back with an exception on the GetValue expression. => ExceptionMessage=LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method 'System.Object GetValue(System.Object, System.Object[])' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression. –  Neil Nov 1 '12 at 16:55

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