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I am hoping a fresh set of eyes can help me find what I am doing wrong. I am trying to search an array for a certain int and once it finds it, it will delete it and shift the remaining elements over to fill in where the "deletion" is.

This would be used on a class obj like A.remove(25) where the obj A contains some vars such as Num (the number of elements in the array), Cap (total capacity of the array), and Pool[] (which contains all of the numbers).

bool Set::remove(int X)
{
        for(unsigned J=0; J<Num; J++)
        {
                if(Pool[J] == X)
                {
                        for(unsigned Z=J; J<Num; Z++)
                        {
                                if(Z == (Num-1))
                                {
                                        Pool[Z] = NULL;
                                }
                                else
                                {
                                        Pool[Z] = Pool[Z+1];
                                }
                        }
                        return true;
                }
        }
        return false;
}
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your inner for loop:

for(unsigned Z=J; J<Num; Z++)

The loop condition should be Z<Num instead of J<Num:

for(unsigned Z=J; Z<Num; Z++)

Otherwise J<Num will keep evaluating to true and Z will be incremented until it's out of bounds of Pool

share|improve this answer
    
@icepack, @SethCarnegie: No, actually I did not =) You'll possibly need to change the font on your browser to notice the difference between J and Z - they do look pretty similar when they are in uppercase (Check the history on my answer and you'll see I had it right from the start) –  sampson-chen Nov 1 '12 at 15:38
    
@sampson-chen crap, you're right :) –  icepack Nov 1 '12 at 15:42
    
I knew it was something like that, wow thanks! –  sharkman Nov 1 '12 at 15:53
    
How would I get it to stop adding a zero on to the end of the array, do I need to get rid of that NULL statement? –  sharkman Nov 1 '12 at 15:54
    
@sharkman It's a bit complicated: right now the NULL statement is acting as a sentinel / flag value for the "end" of your array, I would fix this by decrementing Num by 1 right before you return true in the if statement, and keep using Num as the counter variable to keep track of how many values are actually valid counting sequentially from the first index in Pool. The underlying problem is that resizing an array dynamically is messy since it's contiguous in memory. You can look into realloc: cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/realloc, but I'm really no expert there. –  sampson-chen Nov 1 '12 at 16:07
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