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My professor asked us to generate this output:

A1 B2 C3 D4 E5

F6 G7 H8 I9 J10

K11 L12 M13 N14 O15

P16 Q17 R18 S19 T20

U21 V22 W23 X24 Y25

Z26

I got the correct output but he won't accept my code; he said I have to do it without using an array and using only 2 loops. I can't think of any solutions that can generate the same output. I am wondering if it is possible to make the same output with only 2 loops? I made my code like this but my professor said I have to revise it.

public class lettersAndNumbers {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        String[] abc = {"A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R",
                "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z", };

        int i = 0;
        while ( i < abc.length ) {

            int j = 1;
            while ( j <= 26 ) {

                int k = 1;
                while ( k <= 5 ) {

                    System.out.print(abc[i] + j + "\t");
                    j++;
                    i++;
                        k++;

                    if ( k == 6 ) {
                        System.out.println();
                    }

                }
                k = 1;
            }
        }
    }

}
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I think your professor will be very happy to know that you've done it yourself. –  Egor Nov 1 '12 at 16:25
6  
+1 for attempting it yourself, and not just asking for us to do it all for you! –  Graham Borland Nov 1 '12 at 16:26
1  
Two loops? You can do that in one loop if you know about the modulus operator... –  Mason Wheeler Nov 1 '12 at 16:29
    
You could do it in zero loops using println(). You should ask Prof to clarify what the requirements were. –  DaveRlz Nov 1 '12 at 16:36

6 Answers 6

You can loop on chars actually, which will make your code more readable and avoid using an array for your letters:

int count = 1;
for (char letter = 'A'; letter <= 'Z';) {
    for (int i = 1; i <= 5; ++i, ++letter, ++count) {
        System.out.print(letter);
        System.out.print(count + "\t");
        if (letter == 'Z')
            return;
    }
    System.out.println();
}
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Why is it i <= 5 is the condition in the loop? i dont get it :\ –  j g Nov 1 '12 at 17:02
    
@JaGb clear your looping concepts first. It seems you havent used for loop ever. –  Mohsin Nov 1 '12 at 17:27

Here's a way to do it in one for-loop:

// 'A' starts at 65
int ascii_offset = 65;

// Loop 26 times and print the alphabet
for (int index = 1; index <= 26; index++) {

    // Convert an ascii number to a char
    char c = (char) (ascii_offset + index - 1);

    // Print the char, the index, then a space
    System.out.print("" + c + (index) + " ");

    // After 5 sets of these, print a newline
    if (index % 5 == 0) {
        System.out.println("\n");
    }
}

For further reading about ascii's and int to char conversion, here's a related discussion: Converting int to char in java

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My Java is really really rusty, but I think this is what you're looking for:

for(int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
  System.out.printf("%c%d ", 'A' + i, i + 1);

  if (i % 5 == 0) {
    System.out.println();
  }
}
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Well, don't feel bad. I would have done the same thing you did at first. However, you can do this with just the two loops and no array.

Have one loop simply iterate from 1 to 26. Then have another loop iterate from the ASCII value of capital A (65), through the ASCII value of capital Z (90). All you need to do now, is convert from the ASCII value to a string, and concatenate.

http://www.asciitable.com/

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Any problem doing it in one loop?

public class AlphaOneLoop {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (int i = 65; i <= 90; i++) {
        System.out.print(new String(Character.toChars(i)) + (i - 65 + 1) + " ");

    }
}

}

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You forgot the newlines after every fifth print :p +1 if you implement it using the modulo-operator. –  keyser Nov 1 '12 at 16:36

This oughta do it:

String[] abc = {"A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R",
            "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z", };

for(int i=0; i<abc.length; i++){
 System.out.println(abc[i] + (i+1) + "\t");
 if( i % 5 == 0 ){
  System.out.println();
 }
}
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