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If I create a custom control like this:

public class MyControl : ContentControl
{
   public static readonly DependencyProperty ItemsProperty =               
         DependencyProperty.Register(
                "Items", 
                typeof(ObservableCollection<object>), 
                typeof(MyControl), 
                new PropertyMetadata(null));

   public MyControl()
   {   
       // Setup a default value to empty collection
       // so users of MyControl can call MyControl.Items.Add()
       Items = new ObservableCollection<object>();
   }

   public ObservableCollection<object> Items
   { 
      get { return (ObservableCollection<object>)GetValue(ItemsProperty); } 
      set { SetValue(ItemsProperty, value); } 
   } 
}

And then allow the user to bind to it in Xaml like this:

<DataTemplate>
    <MyControl Items="{Binding ItemsOnViewModel}"/>
</DataTemplate>

Then the binding never works! This is due to the Dependency Property Precedence, which puts CLR Set values above Template bindings!

So, I understand why this isn't working, but I wonder if there is a solution. Is it possible to provide a default value of ItemsProperty to new ObservableCollection for lazy consumers of MyControl that just want to add Items programmatically, while allowing MVVM power-users of My Control to bind to the same property via a DataTemplate?

This is for Silverlight & WPF. DynamicResource setter in a style seemed like a solution but that won't work for Silverlight :(

Update:

I can confirm SetCurrentValue(ItemsProperty, new ObservableCollection<object>()); does exactly what I want - in WPF. It writes the default value, but it can be overridden by template-bindings. Can anyone suggest a Silverlight equivalent? Easier said than done! :s

Another Update:

Apparently you can simulate SetCurrentValue in .NET3.5 using value coercion, and you can simulate value coercion in Silverlight using these techniques. Perhaps there is a (long-winded) workaround here.

SetCurrentValue workaround for .NET3.5 using Value Coercion
Value Coercion workaround for Silverlight

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1  
Instead of Items = new ObservableCollection<object>(); you could call SetCurrentValue(ItemsProperty, new ObservableCollection<object>()); in the constructor. But that would also only work with WPF, not with Silverlight. –  Clemens Nov 1 '12 at 20:32
    
Thanks, we're making progress. Shame about Silverlight! Another solution is to set the default via style as DynamicResource. Again, no silverlight :S –  Dr. ABT Nov 1 '12 at 20:35
    
could you perhaps store the original bindings eg var x = this.GetBindingExpression(ItemsProperty).ParentBinding; then set items to the default and then reset your bindings to what they were? this.SetBinding(ItemsProperty, x); not sure at what level it gets reset - so maybe this could work? –  SteveL Nov 2 '12 at 12:00
    
It's possible - I searched StackOverflow for SetCurrentValue() silverlight and found one other post, no code solution, but they did talk about some curious binding hacks to achieve this. Such a shame there seems to be no native way to do it! –  Dr. ABT Nov 2 '12 at 15:59
    
It works on Silverlight. Do you have a test case? –  Chui Tey Nov 9 '12 at 0:39

2 Answers 2

Can't you just specify the default property of the dependency property:

  public static readonly DependencyProperty ItemsProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Items",
        typeof(ObservableCollection<object>),
        typeof(CaseDetailControl),
        new PropertyMetadata(new ObservableCollection<object>()));

or am I missing what you are after?

Edit:

ah... in that case how about checking for null on the getter?:

    public ObservableCollection<object> Items
    {
        get
        {
            if ((ObservableCollection<object>)GetValue(ItemsProperty) == null)
            {
                this.SetValue(ItemsProperty, new ObservableCollection<object>());
            }

            return (ObservableCollection<object>)GetValue(ItemsProperty);
        }

        set
        {
            this.SetValue(ItemsProperty, value);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
If you do this, the ObservableCollection<object> will be shared across all MyControl instances! Not a desirable effect –  Dr. ABT Nov 1 '12 at 17:45
    
Never knew it would do that! So how about checking for null in the getter as in edit above? Not attempted it, but may work... –  SteveL Nov 1 '12 at 18:02
    
Good catch. I like the check for null in the getter... I stole it for my answer, but +1 to you for thinking of it. –  Jacob Proffitt Nov 1 '12 at 18:17
    
What about the rule that you shouldn't do anything except GetValue/SetValue in the dependency property's CLR wrappers (see the Implementing the Wrapper section in Checklist for Defining a Dependency Property)? I doubt that this is really relevant for the getter, but XAML-generated code might get the property value by bypassing the CLR wrapper and directly calling GetValue. –  Clemens Nov 1 '12 at 19:58
    
Guys, as soon as you call SetValue() on the property, the DataTemplate binding no longer works, due to the DependencyProperty precedence. I'll have to -1 this as it's not a solution, but, good try! –  Dr. ABT Nov 1 '12 at 20:35

When ObservableCollection properties misbehave, I try throwing out assignments to that property. I find that the references don't translate right and bindings get lost, somehow. As a result, I avoid actually setting ObservableCollection properties (preferring, instead, to clear the existing property and add elements to it). This becomes really sloppy with a DependencyProperty because you're going to call your getter multiple times in your setter. You might want to consider using INotifyPropertyChanged instead. Anyway, here's what it'd look like:

EDIT: Blatantly stole the getter from SteveL's answer. I reworked it a touch so that you only have a single call to GetValue, is all. Good work around.

public ObservableCollection<object> Items
{ 
    get
    {
        ObservableCollection<object> coll = (ObservableCollection<object>)GetValue(ItemsProperty);
        if (coll == null)
        {
            coll = new ObservableCollection<object>();
            this.SetValue(ItemsProperty, coll);
        }

        return coll;
    }
    set 
    {
        ObservableCollection<object> coll = Items;
        coll.Clear();
        foreach(var item in value)
            coll.Add(item);
    }
} 

Note that this is depending on your default to set correctly. That means changing the static ItemsProperty default to be a new ObservableCollection of the correct type (i.e. new PropertyMetadata(new ObservableCollection()). You'll also have to remove that setter in the constructor. And note, I've no idea if that'll actually work. If not, you'll want to move to using INotifyPropertyChanged for sure...

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Same comment on this -> new PropertyMetadata(new ObservableCollection()) If you do this, the ObservableCollection<object> will be shared across all MyControl instances! Not a desirable effect –  Dr. ABT Nov 1 '12 at 17:46
    
Very true. You could go with a different version of the PropertyMetadata constructor (one that provides a property changing callback). That's probably the cleaner option than new ObservableCollection<object>() but it has the same limitation of probably needing to be static. This is why I'd really go with converting to INotifyPropertyChanged. –  Jacob Proffitt Nov 1 '12 at 17:59
    
Or use A combination with SteveL's solution of checking null in the getter... I rather like that... –  Jacob Proffitt Nov 1 '12 at 18:05

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