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How to set an enviroment variable from a process that will be visible by all processes ? I'm using C with Glib.

I have 10 processes that use the same library. The problem is that in that library a checking procedure ( which is CPU hungry ) is performed. I want to avoid that library checking procedure to be executed for every process. For the first process that is using the library it will be enough.

Thanks.

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Why do you ask??? What exactly do you want to achieve. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 1 '12 at 17:04
1  
Definitely need some clarity here. Do you want arbitrary processes to see this variable; child processes fork()ed from this process; processes that you've written running under your id, but started from different shells; etc. –  Erik Nedwidek Nov 1 '12 at 17:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is simply not possible.

Setting an environment variable (or changing your current environment) is only visible from the children (and descendants) processes of your current process.

Other processes, in particular the parent process (usually the shell running in the terminal where you start your program) are not affected.

You might play dirty tricks like e.g. adding lines into $HOME/.bashrc etc. But you should not.

You just need to document what environment variables are relevant. It is the user's responsibility to set environment variables (perhaps by manually editing his $HOME/.bashrc etc etc). Leave that freedom to your user. Explain to him how to do that and why.

You edited your question to explain that

I have 10 processes that use the same library. The problem is that in that library a checking procedure ( which is CPU hungry ) is performed. I want to avoid that library checking procedure to be executed for every process.

But you definitely should not need to change environment variable for that.

You could

  1. decide and document that the checking is not performed, unless some particular environment variable (or some program argument) is given

  2. decide that the checking is given a particular file name, and use file locked write to write that file, and use file locked reads to read it again

  3. Have the checking write its result in some known in advance file, and read that file before deciding it you want to make the costly checks

  4. Have one process starting all the others, and inform them about the check (perhaps indeed setting some environment variable or some program argument) or use some Inter Process Communication trick to communicate with the others (you could use sockets, locked files, shared memory, etc etc...)

  5. Do many other tricks.

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What kind of IPC ? I need to cut down CPU usage.My processes start at bootup, and that repetitive operation takes 220 ms. I want to make it only once, and let the other processes know that the check procedure has been done. –  Cumatru Nov 1 '12 at 17:31
    
Just write a file, e.g. in /run or /var/run, telling that the check has been done. Start the other processes after that, and have each of them check that file, or simply, start the other processes by giving them an extra program argument to avoid the check. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 1 '12 at 17:35

That's not possible. You can set the environment for child processes only.

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flock() sounds like it may be your friend.

http://beej.us/guide/bgipc/output/html/multipage/flocking.html

You may also want to look at Semaphores or SHM (Shared Memory).

http://beej.us/guide/bgipc/output/html/multipage/semaphores.html

http://beej.us/guide/bgipc/output/html/multipage/shm.html

It all depends on the level of coordination you want. File locks will be good enough for one process to say stay out while I'm working. Semaphores and shared memory would allow you to coordinate access.

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