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Possible Duplicate:
How to successfully run Perl script with setuid() when used as cgi-bin?

I am running my Perl script as root, and would like to have these commands run as $USER

mkdir bin
cp -r /opt/gitolite .
gitolite/install -ln
gitolite setup -pk ${USER}.pub
rm ${USER}.pub

mkdir -p .gitolite/hooks/common
ln -s /opt/pre-receive .gitolite/hooks/common/

Question

Does Perl have a su -c "mkdir bin" $USER or something similar?

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marked as duplicate by Marc B, rekire, simbabque, Nikhil, fancyPants Nov 5 '12 at 12:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You can set the effective user id by the special variable $> – beresfordt Nov 1 '12 at 17:23
    
By the way I think this question is for askubuntu.com – rekire Nov 1 '12 at 17:25
    
@rekire: Why askubuntu? It's equally valid for any Unix-like system. – Keith Thompson Nov 1 '12 at 17:53
    
This must be the follow-up of stackoverflow.com/questions/13178485/…. What happened to the built-ins? – simbabque Nov 1 '12 at 18:33
1  
@nickisfat, why comment not answer? – JoelFan Nov 1 '12 at 20:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the special variable $> . See: http://perldoc.perl.org/perlvar.html

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Can you give an example? I can't figure out how to use it from the link, and Google doesn't return anything useful with this. – Sandra Schlichting Nov 1 '12 at 20:21
2  
Each user has a numeric uid (which you can get in the /etc/passwd file). Say user Harry has uid = 56. If your Perl script does $> = 56 then the script is now running as Harry. This will only work if your script originally started running as root. – JoelFan Nov 1 '12 at 20:43

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