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I have a file that needs to be read using regular expressions. The string can basically include anything (upper case, lower case, spaces, symbols, etc) so long as the line is no more than 60 characters. The method I tried works for most strings in the file, however, I need to be able to allow quotation marks as well, which is where I'm getting stuck. Here's what I've tried so far.

    else if (data.matches("[A-Za-z0-9 ,.?!%&()@$-_:;\\\"]+$")
            && !label.equals("") && prompt.equals("") && data.length() <= 60)
        {
            prompt = data;
        }

It reads everything else in fine, except the following string

    Yes, but an error is displayed, “Fuser out.”

Don't ask about the spelling, that was what was in the sample file I was given.

Thanks for any help, hopefully I'll get a response before I leave the laundromat, since I'm on Long Island and have no power or internet at home thanks to the hurricane.

share|improve this question
    
If people have answered any of your questions in the past, you should consider going back and marking them as "Accepted" by clicking the checkmark underneath the voting arrows. :) –  Jeff Gohlke Nov 1 '12 at 17:50
    
Can files contain square brackets? –  Asad Nov 1 '12 at 17:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add \" in your regular expression e.g. below:

  data.matches("[A-Za-z0-9 ,.?!%&()@$-_:;\"\\]+$")

where \" is used, it will use " as a literal to match.

share|improve this answer
1  
The \\\" in the current character class (which becomes \" in the regex) is already interpreted as a literal " character. –  Andrew Clark Nov 1 '12 at 17:57
    
oh, ok, makes sense. Thanks. I ended up simplifying it though after some more searching online (found out that I could use a period to match all characters, which made things a bit easier. I will post my solution in a post (since I'm accepting all characters. However, thanks for answering the question it certainly helps me improve upon my regex skills. –  audiFanatic Nov 1 '12 at 18:00
    
@audiFanatic Glad you found a solution, you should note though that this answer doesn't actually change the meaning of the regex, the character class ["] and [\"] ("[\"]" and "[\\\"]" as Java strings) are handled the exact same way. –  Andrew Clark Nov 1 '12 at 18:09

This is copy paste from your code

 "Yes, but an error is displayed, \"Fuser out.\"".matches("[A-Za-z0-9 ,.?!%&()@$-_:;\\\"]+$"));

and it returns true, so it is ok.

But I have a problem when I do the copy paste from your code. The character " in your String "Fuser out." is a different characer than your " in your regular expression ??

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Here's how I ended up simplifying it, if anyone is interested.

    if (data.matches("\n"))
        {
            // do nothing, ignore
        }
        else if (data.matches("[^ ]+$") && label.equals("")
            && data.length() <= 60)
        {
            label = data;
        }

        else if (data.matches(".+$")
            && !label.equals("") && prompt.equals("") && data.length() <= 60)
        {
            prompt = data;
        }

        else if (data.matches(".+$")
            && !label.equals("") && !prompt.equals("") && message.equals("")
            && data.length() <= 60)
        {
            message = data;
        }

        else if (data.matches("[^ ]+[ ]+[0-9]$") && label.equals("")
            && prompt.equals("") && message.equals("") && data.length() <= 60)
        {
            children = data;
            String[] info = children.split("[ ]+");
            parent = info[0];
            numChildren = Integer.parseInt(info[1]);

            tree.getNodeReference(parent).setNumChildren(numChildren);
        }
share|improve this answer

You are probably having issues matching that string because it uses smart quotes. The following article has some good information on this: Handy regexes for smart quotes

The summary is that you can add those characters to your regex using the following Unicode escapes:

\u201C\u201D\u201E\u201F\u2033\u2036

In addition, it looks like you currently intend to allow both backslashes and double quotes in your character class by using \" in your regex (\\\" in the Java string). This is not doing what you think it is, \" will just match a literal " character in you regex, it just has an unnecessary backslash. To actually include backslashes as valid characters, you need four consecutive backslashes in your java string.

You also need to escape the hyphen, otherwise $-_ is interpreted as a character range.

So your new regex would look something like this:

data.matches("[A-Za-z0-9 ,.?!%&()@$\\-_:;\\\\\"\\u201C\\u201D\\u201E\\u201F\\u2033\\u2036]+$")
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that exclude backslashes from the file? –  Asad Nov 1 '12 at 17:58
    
@Asad Just edited my answer to clarify a bit. The original regex would not allow backslashes in the file either, if that is a requirement an extra backslash (two in Java string) needs to be included. –  Andrew Clark Nov 1 '12 at 18:06

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