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This is probably just some simple beginner's mistake, but I just can't seem to figure it out.

I'm just trying to get started with entity framework (ef 5.0, .net 4.5), been rolling all my own sql statements until now. I'm trying to work with an existing database and EF code first, with two simple classes that have a one to many relationship: clips and clip_ratings (there can be zero or many ratings for each clip). the relevant parts of the classes are:

public class clip
{
    public clip()
    {
        this.Ratings = new List<clip_ratings>();
    }

    public virtual ICollection<clip_ratings> Ratings { get; set; }

    public int clip_id { get; set; }
    public Nullable<int> clip_type { get; set; }
    // ...
 }

public class clip_ratings
{
    public int cr_id { get; set; }
    public int cr_clip_id { get; set; }
    // ...

    [ForeignKey("cr_clip_id")]
    public clip Clip { get; set; }
}

Now I'm trying to read some data from the DB:

           var query = from b in db.clips
                        orderby b.clip_id where b.Ratings.Count > 1
                        select b;

            foreach (var item in query)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item.Ratings.Count +" | "+item.clip_linktext);
            }

The query returns the correct resultset from the DB, however it errors on the item.Ratings.Count. When I just output item.clip_linktext all is fine, but with the item.Ratings.Count I get the following error:

More than one item in the metadata collection match the identity 'clip_ratings'.

I've tried following all the MS EF tutorials and reading up on some more posts, but just can't seem to figure it out. Hope somebody here can help me along on this (and that it is easy to fix ;))

update: adding the classMap.cs sources:

public class clipMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<clip>
{
    public clipMap()
    {
        // Primary Key
        this.HasKey(t => t.clip_id);
        // ...


        // Table & Column Mappings
        this.ToTable("clips");
        this.Property(t => t.clip_id).HasColumnName("clip_id");
        this.Property(t => t.clip_type).HasColumnName("clip_type");
        ...
     }
 }

public class clip_ratingsMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<clip_ratings>
{
    public clip_ratingsMap()
    {
        // Primary Key
        this.HasKey(t => t.cr_id);
        // Table & Column Mappings
        this.ToTable("clip_ratings");
        this.Property(t => t.cr_id).HasColumnName("cr_id");
        this.Property(t => t.cr_clip_id).HasColumnName("cr_clip_id");
        // ...
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
forgot to mention that all primary keys, column and table names are configured through fluent api map files (therefore no [Key] annotations in the source above) –  Tom Nov 1 '12 at 19:32

2 Answers 2

Mark clip_id and cr_id with the KeyAttribute and the Ratings property with the InversePropertyAttribute like this:

public class clip
{
    public clip()
    {
        this.Ratings = new List<clip_ratings>();
    }

    [InverseProperty("Clip")]
    public virtual ICollection<clip_ratings> Ratings { get; set; }

    [Key]
    public int clip_id { get; set; }
    public Nullable<int> clip_type { get; set; }
    // ...
 }

public class clip_ratings
{
    [Key]
    public int cr_id { get; set; }
    public int cr_clip_id { get; set; }
    // ...

    [ForeignKey("cr_clip_id")]
    public clip Clip { get; set; }
}

Read about Code First Data Annotations

PS! SERIOUSLY consider reading General Naming Conventions and Guidelines for Names

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for naming conventions –  TylerOhlsen Nov 1 '12 at 18:54
    
it is a VERY old db, hence the names... –  Tom Nov 1 '12 at 19:16
    
Unfortunately this did not help, still the same error. I also forgot to mention that the primary keys are configured in the classMap files, but also tried using annotations for the PKs instead of the fluent api, just like you posted. –  Tom Nov 1 '12 at 19:21
    
So you are mixing the fluent API and data annotations? It would be great if you could post your ClassMaps... For the naming convention part, I would still follow C# conventions and map the columns with the ColumnAttribute –  khellang Nov 1 '12 at 19:24
    
all keys, column and table names are mapped through the fluent api files the EF power tools reverse engineer code first created. the annotations and relations were then manually added. what i've read so far leads me to believe that mixing both is not a problem as long as there are no conflicting settings/attributes. When I let VS display the entity diagram it looks fine (including the 1:n relation), and the sql query also translates correctly for joining the two tables. I just don't know what's causing the error... –  Tom Nov 1 '12 at 19:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

ok, after another hour of messing with about every part of this simple example I found a solution: apparently EF didn't like the collection being called "Ratings", even though there's no part in the DB or code anywhere with a property/field/attribute of that name.

Changed the name to Votes instead of Ratings to

    public clip()
    {
        this.Votes = new List<clip_ratings>();
    }

    public virtual ICollection<clip_ratings> Votes { get; set; }

and everything works just fine.

Guess that's why I've avoided these kind of frameworks so far, you never really know what they're doing under the hood ;)

And yes, if I get a chance to remodel the db, I will try to follow the naming conventions.

If anyone has a good explanation of why it didn't work with Ratings, I'd still like to hear it, to be able to avoid similar situations in the future.

share|improve this answer
2  
I can only imagine that there was name collision between the entity class name clip_ratings and the association name for the one-to-many relationship that EF will possibly name clip_Ratings (class name + underscore + navigation property name). Maybe metadata names must be unique even if they have different purpose. You know, you hadn't have this problem if you wouldn't use such a crazy naming instead of .NET guideline compliant names :) –  Slauma Nov 1 '12 at 21:18
    
Just because the DB has crazy naming doesn't mean you have to litter your code :P –  khellang Nov 11 '13 at 11:53

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