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Ive spent last week trying to figure out this memory leak and I am desperate at this point. Id be glad for any help.

I have class Solver which creates instance of class PartialGraph in every iteration in method solve (performing Depth First Search). In every iteration PartialGraph should be copied to stack, and destroyed

Solver.h

class Solver {
public:
Solver(Graph pg);
PartialGraph solve(PartialGraph p, int bestest);
Graph pg;
stack<PartialGraph>  stackk;
bool isSpanningTree(PartialGraph* p);
 Solver(const Solver& orig);
 ~Solver();

Solver.cpp

Solver:: Solver(const Solver& orig){
     this->pg=*new Graph(orig.pg);   
     }

Solver::Solver(Graph gpg) {
    this->pg=gpg;
    }

PartialGraph Solver::solve(PartialGraph init, int bestest){

    int best=bestest;
    int iterace=0;
    PartialGraph bestGraph;
    stackk.push(init);

    while(stackk.size()!=0) {

        PartialGraph m = stackk.top(); 
        stackk.pop();


          for(int i=m.rightestEdge+1;i<pg.edgeNumber;i++){

              *******(line 53 )PartialGraph* pnew= m.addEdge(pg.edges[i]);  


              if(m.generatedNodes==pnew->generatedNodes){
              pnew->~PartialGraph();
              continue;  }

              if(isSpanningTree(pnew)){     
              if(best>pnew->maxDegree){
              best=pnew->maxDegree;
              bestGraph=*pnew;
              }
              if(pnew->maxDegree==2){
              pnew->~PartialGraph();
              return bestGraph;
              }
             pnew->~PartialGraph();
             continue;
             }

             if(pnew->maxDegree==best){
             pnew->~PartialGraph();
             continue;   }

             stackk.push(*pnew);

             *******(line 101 )pnew->~PartialGraph();
           }

    }

return bestGraph;
}



bool Solver::isSpanningTree(PartialGraph* p){
   if(p->addedEdges!=this->pg.nodeNumber-1){return false;}
   return  p->generatedNodes==this->pg.nodeNumber;
}

 Solver::~Solver(){
 this->pg.~Graph();
 };

PartialGraph looks like this, it has two arrays, both deleted in destructor. Every constructor and operator= allocates new memory for the arrays. (Class Edge holds three ints)

PartialGraph::PartialGraph(int nodeNumber,int edgeNumber) { 
    nodeCount=nodeNumber;
    edgeCount=0;
    nodes=new int[nodeCount];
    edges=new Edge[0]; 
    rightestEdge=-1;
    generatedNodes=0;
    addedEdges=0;
    for(int i=0;i<nodeCount;i++){
      this->nodes[i]=0;
     }

     maxDegree=0;
}

PartialGraph::PartialGraph(const PartialGraph& orig){
    this->nodes=new int[orig.nodeCount];
    edges=new Edge[orig.edgeCount];
    this->nodeCount=orig.nodeCount;
    this->rightestEdge=orig.rightestEdge;
    this->edgeCount=orig.edgeCount;
    this->maxDegree=orig.maxDegree;
    this->addedEdges=orig.addedEdges;
    this->generatedNodes=orig.generatedNodes;

    for(int i=0;i<this->nodeCount;i++){  
    this->nodes[i]=orig.nodes[i];            
    }

   for(int i=0;i<this->edgeCount;i++){ 
    this->edges[i]=orig.edges[i];        
    }
}

PartialGraph::PartialGraph(){
}

PartialGraph::PartialGraph(const PartialGraph& orig, int i){

    this->nodes=new int[orig.nodeCount];
    edges=new Edge[orig.edgeCount+1];
    this->nodeCount=orig.nodeCount;
    this->rightestEdge=orig.rightestEdge;
    this->edgeCount=orig.edgeCount;
    this->maxDegree=orig.maxDegree;
    this->addedEdges=orig.addedEdges;
    this->generatedNodes=orig.generatedNodes;

    for(int i=0;i<this->nodeCount;i++){ 
    this->nodes[i]=orig.nodes[i];
    }

   for(int i=0;i<this->edgeCount;i++){
  this->edges[i]=orig.edges[i];        
  }
}


PartialGraph &PartialGraph::operator =(const PartialGraph &orig){
nodes=new int[orig.nodeCount];
edges=new Edge[orig.edgeCount];
this->nodeCount=orig.nodeCount;
this->rightestEdge=orig.rightestEdge;
this->edgeCount=orig.edgeCount;
this->maxDegree=orig.maxDegree;
this->addedEdges=orig.addedEdges;
this->generatedNodes=orig.generatedNodes;
for(int i=0;i<this->nodeCount;i++){  
this->nodes[i]=orig.nodes[i];

}
for(int i=0;i<this->edgeCount;i++){

    this->edges[i]=orig.edges[i];        
}


 }

PartialGraph* PartialGraph::addEdge(Edge e){
PartialGraph* npg=new PartialGraph(*this, 1);
  npg->edges[this->edgeCount]=e;
npg->addedEdges++;
npg->edgeCount++;
if(e.edgeNumber>npg->rightestEdge){npg->rightestEdge=e.edgeNumber;}
npg->nodes[e.node1]=npg->nodes[e.node1]+1;
npg->nodes[e.node2]=npg->nodes[e.node2]+1;

if(npg->nodes[e.node1]>npg->maxDegree){npg->maxDegree=npg->nodes[e.node1];}
 if(npg->nodes[e.node2]>npg->maxDegree){npg->maxDegree=npg->nodes[e.node2];}

 if(npg->nodes[e.node1]==1){npg->generatedNodes++;}
 if(npg->nodes[e.node2]==1){npg->generatedNodes++;}
return npg;
}





PartialGraph:: ~PartialGraph() //destructor
{

    delete [] nodes;
    delete [] edges;
};

PartialGraph.h

class PartialGraph {
public:
PartialGraph(int nodeCount,int edgeCount);
PartialGraph* addEdge(Edge e);
PartialGraph(const PartialGraph& orig);
PartialGraph();
~PartialGraph();
static int counter;
PartialGraph(const PartialGraph& orig, int i);
void toString();
int nodeCount;
int edgeCount;
int generatedNodes;
int *nodes;
Edge *edges;

int maxDegree;
int rightestEdge;
int addedEdges;
PartialGraph &operator =(const PartialGraph &other); // Assn. operator
};

It runs fine, but when input data are too big, I get bad alloc. Valgrind says I am leaking on line 53 of PartialGraph.cpp, but Im almost sure all instances are destroyed at line 101, or earlier in the iteration.

 (244,944 direct, 116 indirect) bytes in 5,103 blocks are definitely lost in         
   at 0x4C2AA37: operator new(unsigned long) 
  (in /usr/lib64/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
  by 0x4039F6: PartialGraph::addEdge(Edge) (PartialGraph.cpp:107)
  by 0x404197: Solver::solve(PartialGraph, int) (Solver.cpp:53)
  by 0x4016BA: main (main.cpp:35)

  LEAK SUMMARY:
  definitely lost: 246,305 bytes in 5,136 blocks
   indirectly lost: 1,364 bytes in 12 blocks

I have even made an instance counter and it seemed that I destroy all of the instances. As I said I am really desperate, and help would be welcome

share|improve this question
1  
This code is terribly hard to read. You should reformat it to get better results from here. –  user984444 Nov 1 '12 at 18:42
    
hopefully this is better –  user1792161 Nov 1 '12 at 19:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The short answer: you should never be calling the destructor directly. Use delete instead, so everywhere where you have pnew->~PartialGraph();, you should have delete pnew;. In general, every new should have a corresponding delete somewhere. Just be careful, this rule has some trickiness to it, because multiple deletes may map to one new, and vice versa.

Bonus leaks that I found while looking at the code:

  • The first line of executable code in your post: this->pg=*new Graph(orig.pg);. Another general rule: if you have code that does *new Foo(...), you're probably creating a leak (and probably creating unnecessary work for yourself). In this case, this->pg = orig.pg should work fine. You're current code copies orig.pg into a newly allocated object, and then copies the newly created object into this->pg, which results in two copy operations. this->pg = orig.pg is just one copy.
  • The first couple of lines PartialGraph::operator=(). Copy constructors, assignment operators, and destructors can be difficult to get right. In all of your constructors, you new nodes and edges, and you have matching deletes in the destructor, so that's ok. But when you do the assignment operator, you overwrite the pointers to the existing arrays but don't delete them. You need to delete the existing arrays before creating new ones.

Lastly, yikes. I know it can be a pain to format your code for StackOverflow, but trying to read the code in Solver::solve() is beyond painful because the indentation doesn't match the code structure. When I looked at this post, there were 23 views and no responses. That's 23 people that were interested in solving your problem, but were probably put off by the formatting. If you spent an extra 23 minutes formatting the code, and it saved each of those people more than one minute, you would have saved the universe some time (besides probably getting your answer faster).

share|improve this answer
    
That was it ! Its working thank you Am I guessing right that calling destructor directly cause member variables not being deallocated from the heap? –  user1792161 Nov 6 '12 at 10:09
    
Calling the destructor allows the object to do any internal cleanup that it needs to do, but does not deallocate the object itself. –  Tom Panning Nov 6 '12 at 15:52

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