Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have following code:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        baz=self.bar(10)

    @staticmethod
    def bar(n):
        if n==0:
            return 'bar'
        else:
            return bar(n-1)

bar() as a recursive function it needs reference to itself. However, bar() is inside a class, and calling return bar(n-1) will not work, invoking NameError: global name 'bar' is not defined. How can I deal with this kind of situation? Should I change bar() to a class or instance method, allowing access to self or cls?

share|improve this question
    
Does calling Foo.bar(n-1) in the recursive call help? –  inspectorG4dget Nov 1 '12 at 18:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An alternative to using a class method or calling the class by name (as shown by others) is to use a closure to hold the reference to the function:

class Foo(object):
    def bar():
        def bar(n):
            if n == 0:
               return "bar"
            return bar(n-1)
        return bar
    bar = staticmethod(bar())

The (minor) advantage is that this is somewhat less susceptible to breaking when names change. For example, if you have a reference to Foo.bar inside bar, this relies on Foo continuing to be a global name for the class that bar is defined in. Usually this is the case but if it isn't, then the recursive call breaks.

The classmethod approach will provide the method with a reference to the class, but the class isn't otherwise needed in the method, which seems inelegant. Using the closure will also be marginally faster because it isn't doing an attribute lookup on each call.

share|improve this answer

You can refer to bar by prefixing it with the class name:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        baz=self.bar(10)

    @staticmethod
    def bar(n):
        if n==0:
            return 'bar'
        else:
            return Foo.bar(n-1)

Static methods are nothing but regular functions contained within the namespace of a class after all.

Alternatively, define bar as a regular function instead:

def bar(n):
    if n==0:
        return 'bar'
    else:
        return bar(n-1)

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        baz=bar(10)

which avoids the whole issue altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
@senderle: yeah, just a c&p error on my part. You need it in Python 3 too. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 1 '12 at 18:51
    
Actually the code runs correctly without it in Python 3 -- at least when called from Foo itself. (But I see that it doesn't work when called from a Foo instance.) –  senderle Nov 1 '12 at 18:54
3  
@senderle It works in Python 3 because there are no more "unbound method" wrappers which require isinstance(self, DefiningClass) on calling methods. One thing that only works with @staticmethod is calling the method on an instance (Foo().bar(1)). –  delnan Nov 1 '12 at 18:57
2  
@senderle: the first argument of a method is call self only by convention. Since bar accepts an argument named n, it'll be used as the instance-bound parameter instead. And Python 3 no longer enforces the first-parameter-of-a-class-function-must-be-an-instance check, calling class.method(integer) works without an error. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 1 '12 at 18:57

What about that?

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        baz = self.bar(10)

    @classmethod
    def bar(cls, n):
        if n == 0:
            return 'bar'
        else:
            return cls.bar(n-1)
share|improve this answer

You can define bar() outside of Foo and then bring it in as a staticmethod so that you get all of the benefits of it being a method of the class while not having to close it or reference the class itself. I have needed something like this for class inheritance reasons.

def bar(n):
    if n==0:
        return 'bar'
    else:
        return bar(n-1)

class Foo(object):
    bar = staticmethod(bar)
    def __init__(self):
        baz=self.bar(10)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.